A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006. Now a Popeyes fast food restaurant on Google Maps.

Recent entries:
“Can anyone tell me what oblivious means? I have no idea” (7/21)
“Sundays were made for good coffee, good music, and being lazy with the people you love” (7/21)
“The people who currently own this world don’t care which ruler you choose. They care only that you keep choosing to be ruled” (7/21)
“I tried memeing less, but it made my days memeingless” (7/21)
“I tried memeing less, but it made my day memeingless” (7/21)
More new entries...

A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z


Entry from December 10, 2022
“An ounce of behavior is worth a pound of words” (acting adage)

“An ounce of behavior is worth a pound of words” is an acting adage that has been printed on many images. The saying is credited to acting teacher Sanford Meisner (1905-1997). “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure” is the famous saying that this is based on.
     
“Two casually instructive signs: ACT BEFORE YOU THINK. AN OUNCE OF BEHAVIOR IS WORTH A POUND OF WORDS” was printed in the book The Victims: The Wylie-Hoffert Murder Case and Its Strange Aftermath (1969) by Bernard Lefkowitz and ‎Ken Gross. “The signs carry admonitions like “Be Specific,’ ‘Act Before You Think’ and ‘An Ounce of Behavior is Worth a Pound of Words’” was printed in the New York (NY) Times on April 7, 1985. “Two exhortatory maxims written in the style of pseudo-illuminated manuscripts hang on either side of the blackboard. Be Specific!, says one, and the other, An Ounce of BEHAVIOR is Worth a Pound of WORDS” was printed in the book Sanford Meisner on Acting (1987) by Sanford Meisner & Dennis Longwell.
   
       
Wikipedia: Sanford Meisner
Sanford Meisner (August 31, 1905 – February 2, 1997) was an American actor and acting teacher who developed an approach to acting instruction that is now known as the Meisner technique. While Meisner was exposed to method acting at the Group Theatre, his approach differed markedly in that he completely abandoned the use of affective memory, a distinct characteristic of method acting. Meisner maintained an emphasis on “the reality of doing”, which was the foundation of his approach.
 
The Meisner technique
Meisner’s unusual techniques were considered both unorthodox and effective. Actor Dennis Longwell wrote of sitting in on one of Meisner’s classes one day, when Meisner brought two students forward for an acting exercise. They were given a single line of dialogue, told to turn away, and instructed not to do or say anything until something happened to make them say the words (one of the fundamental principles of the Meisner technique). The first student’s line came when Meisner approached him from behind and gave him a strong pinch on the back, inspiring him to jump away and yelp his line in pain. The other student’s line came when Meisner reached around and slipped his hand into her blouse. Her line came out as a giggle as she moved away from his touch.
     
Google Books
The Victims:
The Wylie-Hoffert Murder Case and Its Strange Aftermath

By Bernard Lefkowitz and ‎Ken Gross
New York, NY: Putnam
1969
Pg. 53:
Eight hours a day for two years, they practiced dance exercises in a mirrored studio, rehearsed scenes in a small green-and-blue basement theater, and studied their scripts in a cozy wood-beamed library adorned with two casually instructive signs: ACT BEFORE YOU THINK. AN OUNCE OF BEHAVIOR IS WORTH A POUND OF WORDS.
 
7 April 1985, New York (NY) Times, “Dedicated To the Religion Of Acting” by Stephen Fife, pg. H5, cols. 1-2:
The signs carry admonitions like “Be Specific,” “Act Before You Think” and “An Ounce of Behavior is Worth a Pound of Words.”
(At the Neighborhood Playhouse School, on East 54th Street between First and Second Avenue.—ed.)
 
Google Books
Sanford Meisner on Acting
By Sanford Meisner & Dennis Longwell
New York, NY: Vintage Books
1987
Pg. 3:
Two (Pg. 4.—ed.) exhortatory maxims written in the style of pseudo-illuminated manuscripts hang on either side of the blackboard. Be Specific!, says one, and the other, An Ounce of BEHAVIOR is Worth a Pound of WORDS.
   
Google Books
Twentieth Century Actor Training
By Alison Hodge
London, UK: Routledge
2000
Pg. 142:
Acting for Meisner is in the doing; from this all other facets of the role emerge. In his classroom were posted signs which read: ‘Act Before You Think’, and ‘An Ounce of Behavior Is Worth a Pound of Words’.
   
Google Books
Kids Take the Stage:
Helping Young People Discover the Creative Outlet of Theater

By Lenka Peterson and Dan O’Conner
New York, NY: Back Stage Books
2006 (revised in 2010)
Pg. 20:
A sign on the wall at the Neighborhood Playhouse, the well-known acting school in New York City, quotes Sanford Meisner, the director and teacher:
 
An ounce of behavior is worth a pound of words.
 
Twitter
Unstoppable Acting Studio
@UnstoppActors
THINGS YOU CAN LEARN FROM SANFORD MEISNER! 🧠
Acting is the reality of doing.
Acting is living truthfully under imaginary circumstances.
An ounce of behaviour is worth a pound of words.
Listen and respond.
6:00 AM · Oct 25, 2020
 
Twitter
Alison Lohman
@ActwithAlison
“An ounce of behavior is worth a pound of words.”
💗Sanford Meisner
10:38 AM · Sep 6, 2022

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityMusic/Dance/Theatre/Film/Circus • Saturday, December 10, 2022 • Permalink


Commenting is not available in this channel entry.