A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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Entry from January 26, 2013
“When presidents can’t run for re-election, they run for the Nobel Peace Prize”

A president of the United States can serve only two four-year terms (according to the 22nd Amendment to the United States Constitution). During a president’s second term, the office holder usually tries to establish a legacy as a statesman of the world.

Stephen Hess, a scholar of the presidency based at the Brookings Institution, said in November 1996 after the presidential re-election of Bill Clinton:

“There’s an old cliche that when presidents cannot run for another term, they run for the Nobel Peace Prize. They certainly run for their place in history.

Hess said in January 2013 after the re-election and around the second inauguration of Barack Obama:

“The saying is that once you have run your last election you run for the Nobel Peace Prize. The problem is that he already has that, even if it was a largely symbolic gesture.”

It’s not known who first came up with the saying.


Wikipedia: Stephen H. Hess
Stephen H. Hess (born April 20, 1933 in New York City) is a senior fellow emeritus in the Governance Studies program at the Brookings Institution. He studies media, the U.S. presidency, political dynasties and the U.S. government. He first joined Brookings in 1972 and was distinguished research professor of media and public affairs at the George Washington University (2004–2009). He served on Presidents Dwight D. Eisenhower and Richard Nixon White House staff and as advisor to Presidents Gerald R. Ford and Jimmy Carter.

Google Groups: alt.current-events.clinton.whitewater
SPOT NEWS 11-14-96
alt.ww
11/14/96
(...)
Clinton Preoccupied By Foreign Policy
Reuter 11/14/96
(...)
Stephen Hess, a scholar of the presidency based at the Brookings Institution, a Washington think-tank, said that Clinton’s focus on international affairs is likely to become more and more pronounced as his second term unfolds.

“There’s an old cliche that when presidents cannot run for another term, they run for the Nobel Peace Prize. They certainly run for their place in history,” he said.

Concord (NH) Monitor
Obama thinking big for term No. 2
By Scott Wilson The Washington Post
Monday, January 21, 2013
(Published in print: Monday, January 21, 2013)
(...)
“He knows what he’s done, he knows what he can’t do, he knows what he must accomplish and he knows what he’d like to accomplish,” said Stephen Hess, a presidential scholar at the Brookings Institution.
(...)
With a recalcitrant Congress at home, Obama, like second-term presidents before him, may find more room abroad to shape his legacy.

“The saying is that once you have run your last election you run for the Nobel Peace Prize,” said Hess, the presidential scholar. “The problem is that he already has that, even if it was a largely symbolic gesture.”

Tampa Bay (FL) Times
President Barack Obama starting second term on aggressive pace
By Alex Leary, Times Staff Writer
In Print: Monday, January 21, 2013
(...)
“A second term is like an hourglass with the time running out. The president’s best opportunities are early opportunities,” said Stephen Hess, a scholar at the Brookings Institution who worked for four presidents.
(...)
“The axiom is when they can’t run for re-election, they run for the Nobel Peace Prize,” said Hess, the presidential scholar.

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityGovernment/Law/Politics/Military • Saturday, January 26, 2013 • Permalink