A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

Recent entries:
“What looks like half an apple?"/"The other half.” (10/20)
“Why is food better than men?"/"Because you don’t have to wait an hour for seconds.” (10/20)
“Trains are just boring rollercoasters” (10/20)
“What has no legs, but can do a split?"/"A banana.” (10/20)
“My landlord wanted to come talk to me about the high heating bill. I said, ‘My door’s always open’’ (10/20)
More new entries...

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Entry from August 14, 2016
“When a politician does get an idea he usually gets it wrong”

Entry in progress—B.P.

Wikipedia: Don Marquis
Donald Robert Perry Marquis (/ˈmɑːrkwɪs/ mar-kwis; July 29, 1878 in Walnut, Illinois – December 29, 1937 in New York City) was a humorist, journalist, and author. He was variously a novelist, poet, newspaper columnist, and playwright. He is remembered best for creating the characters “Archy” and “Mehitabel”, supposed authors of humorous verse. During his lifetime he was equally famous for creating another fictitious character, “the Old Soak,” who was the subject of two books, a hit Broadway play (1922–23), a silent movie (1926) and a talkie (1937).

21 April 1921, Baltimore (MD) American, Don Marquis column, pg. 4, col. 4:
When a politician does get an idea he usually gets it wrong.

2 June 1925, New York (NY) Herald Tribune, “The Lantern” by Don Marquis, pg. 16, col. 4:
When a politician does get an idea he usually gets it wrong.

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityGovernment/Law/Politics/Military • Sunday, August 14, 2016 • Permalink