A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

Recent entries:
“I used to work in a fire hydrant factory. You couldn’t park anywhere near the place” (11/19)
“Watch repairmen always get to work on time” (11/19)
“I never use body butter. I don’t want to make myself irresistible to cannibals” (11/19)
“Why do midgets make bad parents?"/"Because they struggle to put food on the table.” (11/19)
“I went fishing today with my two friends, Rod and Annette” (11/19)
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Entry from October 23, 2011
“Store what you eat and eat what you store”

"Store what you eat and eat what you store” is a popular adage of storing survival foods. The foods stored should be what a person likes to eat, and the foods should be eaten before they go bad and have to be thrown away.

“Store what you eat and eat what you store” has been cited in print since at least 1970.


23 March 1970, Idaho Falls (ID) Post-Register, “Conference Draws 1,444,” pg. 9, col. 3:
Emphasizing the importance of storing a year’s supply of food, President Pieper said “Store what you eat and eat what you store.”
(Henry W. Pieper of Rexburg Stake Tabernacle—ed.)

Google Books
A Family Raised on Sunshine
By Beverly K. Nye
Shaker Heights, OH: Corinthian Press
1977
Pg. 71:
We also want to be able to eat nutritiously during times of need when we use our food storage. It is only feasible, then, to “Store what you eat and eat what you store.”

2 November 1977, Boston (MA) Globe, “Local Mormons know what’s in store for them” by Gail Perrin, pg. 29:
When it comes to food, “essentially you store what you eat and eat what you store,” says Ann Romish of the Mormon philosophy.
(...)
Foods store best jn dry cool areas - preferably between 40 to 60 degrees - but no food can be stored forever: Thus the “store what you eat and eat what you store” adage.

Google NewsArchive
26 November 1980, Montreal (Quebec) Gazette, pg. 64, col. 1:
Eat what you store,
store what you eat

OTTAWA (CP)—It can happen when you least expect it. You live alone and become ill or a severe winter storm keeps you indoors. You haven’t shopped in days and there’s no food in the house.
(...)
“It saves time and money to have food on hand. However, no matter how extensive your food-storage plan is, remember to eat what you store and store what you eat.”
(Jill Carman, consultant for the food advisory division of Agriculture Canada—ed.)

3 May 1981, Mobile (AL) Press Register, “Cooking is fun!” by Tommye Miller, pg. 13D, col. 1:
Her church teaches that you store what you eat, and you eat what you store, “going on the premise that if you’re in a crisis situation you wouldn’t have to change your eating habits radically.”

Suburban Survival Blog
May 18, 2011
“Store what you eat, eat what you store”
(...)
But, I do store large quantities of items I don’t eat on a regular basis, in recognition that my post-SHTF diet will be laden with the standard rice and bean staples. As a result I have modified the simple “store what you eat, eat what you store” to this:

1) If what you eat is storable either in can goods lasting greater than one year, by all means store it and rotate it through your kitchen.

2) Purchase items you don’t normally eat that last longer than two years and have 30-60 days of supply in cans or other packages. Include good-tasting soups and grain-based breakfast food.

3) For items you would never eat unless the SHTF, purchase or package to store in excess of 20 years.

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityFood/Drink • (0) Comments • Sunday, October 23, 2011 • Permalink