A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

Recent entries:
“I used to work in a fire hydrant factory. You couldn’t park anywhere near the place” (11/19)
“Watch repairmen always get to work on time” (11/19)
“I never use body butter. I don’t want to make myself irresistible to cannibals” (11/19)
“Why do midgets make bad parents?"/"Because they struggle to put food on the table.” (11/19)
Entry forthcoming—B.P. (11/19)
More new entries...

A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z


Entry from December 26, 2006
Spanglish

"Spanglish” is Spanish + English. It’s the Spanish language peppered with large doses of English words, popular in some places of Texas, California, Florida and New York. The term “Spanglish” dates from at least 1958.


(Oxford English Dictionary)
Spanglish
[Blend of SPANISH n.1 + ENGLISH n.]
A type of Spanish contaminated by English words and forms of expression, spoken in Latin America.
[1954 S. TÍO A. Fuego Lento 62 Esta lengua nueva se llamará el ‘Espanglish’. La etimología es clara. Viene de español y de english.] 1967 Time 7 Apr. 12 A historical pageant known as a ‘Texas Fandangle’—border-country Spanglish for fandango, the frenetic Mexican dance.

3 January 1958, Los Angeles Times, “Cityside” with Gene Sherman, pg. 2:
You know the rest of the story and there’s enough of Mr. Jeannette’s Spanglish to carry it on.

5 October 1958, Syracuse (NY) Herald-American, pg. 74, col. 7:
Spanglish
BURBANK, Calif.—Hollywood members of the Warner Bros. unit filming “John Paul Jones” in Spain have a name of their own for the combination of Spanish, English and sign language they use to make themselves understood on the set. They call it Spanglish.

10 November 1964, Washington Post, pg. A16:
Notes on Mexico:
Habla Spanglish?
by Karl E. Meyer

Posted by Barry Popik
Texas (Lone Star State Dictionary) • (0) Comments • Tuesday, December 26, 2006 • Permalink