A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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Entry from October 17, 2010
“If you don’t like the news, go out and make some of your own”

"If you don’t like the news, go out and make some of your own” is a catchphrase of Wes “Scoop” Nisker, a San Francisco (CA) broadcaster. Nisker has used the phrase since the 1960s and used it again in 1994 for a book title. Conservative commentator George F. Will has referred to the saying as a political axiom.


Wikipedia: Wes Nisker
Wes ("Scoop") Nisker (born 1942) is an author, radio commentator, comedian, and Buddhist meditation instructor. Nisker is a longtime fixture on San Francisco radio station KFOG. He has become well-known for the catchphrase, “If you don’t like the news ... go out and make some of your own,” which he used as the title for a 1994 book. He and his books have been covered in various publications of record. He is the founder and co-editor of the international Theravada Buddhist journal “Inquiring Mind.” He is one of the regular teachers at the Spirit Rock Meditation Center in Marin County, California.

Google Books
6 May 1972, Billboard magazine, pg. 76, col. 4:
SCOOP NISKER. “If You Don’t LIKE THE News, Go Out and Make Some Of Your Own,” Scoop.
Cuts: “Creeps.”
Stations: KFML-FM

Google Books
A Trumpet to Arms:
Alternative media in America

By David Armstrong
Los Angeles, CA: J.P. Tarcher; Boston.MA: distributed by Houghton Mifflin
1981
Pg. 80:
Nisker’s sense of fun did not preclude invo9lvement in politics. He ended each show with the activist tagline: “If you don’t like the news, go out and make some of your own.” Sometimes Nisker helped his listeners make the news as well. “In 1970,” remembered Nisker, “after the guilty verdicts in the Chicago Conspiracy Trial were announced [and radicals took to the streets in Berkeley in protest], the San Francisco Examiner had an article saying that the rioters were listening to the KSAN News to find out where to go. And they were, of course, because we were giving them directions.”

OCLC WorldCat record
If you don’t like the news—go out and make some of your own
Author: Wes Nisker
Publisher: Berkeley, Calif. : Ten Speed Press, ©1994.
Edition/Format: Book : Biography : English

Google News Archive
19 March 2003, The Hour (Norwalk, CT), “Bush speech directed at several audiences” by George F. Will, pg. A10, col. 2:
WASHINGTON—The president demonstrated Monday night that he understands a tested political axiom: If you do not like the news, make some of your own.

Google News Archive
1 November 2005, Pittsburgh (PA) Post-Gazette, “Bring it on: With the nomination of Judge Alito to the Supreme Court, the nation will have a proper deabte about the nation” by George F. Will, pg. B7, col. 1:
He quickly cauterized that self-inflicted wound and acted on this political axiom: If you don’t like the news, make some of your own.

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityMedia/Newspapers/Magazines/Internet • (0) Comments • Sunday, October 17, 2010 • Permalink