A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

Recent entries:
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“Why is food better than men?"/"Because you don’t have to wait an hour for seconds.” (10/20)
“Trains are just boring rollercoasters” (10/20)
Entry forthcoming—B.P. (10/20)
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Entry from October 15, 2010
“I disagree with you, but I’m pretty sure you’re not Hitler”

Jon Stewart announced his October 30, 2010 “The Rally to Restore Sanity” on Comedy Central’s The Daily Show on September 16, 2010. Stewart suggested one sign: “I disagree with you, but I’m pretty sure you’re not Hitler.”

The sign is a joke on “Godwin’s Law of Nazi Analogies.” Wikipedia describes Godwin’s Law: “Godwin put forth the sarcastic observation that, given enough time, all discussions—regardless of topic or scope—inevitably end up being about Hitler and the Nazis.”

The Daily Show‘s humorous “Rally to Restore Sanity” sign was cited on many blogs and websites.


Wikipedia: Jon Stewart
Jon Stewart (born Jonathan Stuart Leibowitz; November 28, 1962) is an American political satirist, writer, television host, actor, media critic and stand-up comedian. He is widely known as host of The Daily Show, a satirical news program that airs on Comedy Central.

Stewart started as a stand-up comedian, but branched into television as host of Short Attention Span Theater for Comedy Central. He went on to host his own show on MTV, called The Jon Stewart Show, and then hosted another show on MTV called You Wrote It, You Watch It. He has also had several film roles as an actor. Stewart became the host of The Daily Show on Comedy Central in early 1999. He is also a writer and co-executive-producer of the show. After Stewart joined, The Daily Show steadily gained popularity and critical acclaim, which led to his first Emmy Award in 2001.

Wikipedia: Godwin’s law
Godwin’s law (also known as Godwin’s Rule of Nazi Analogies or Godwin’s Law of Nazi Analogies) is a humorous observation made by Mike Godwin in 1989 which has become an Internet adage. It states: “As an online discussion grows longer, the probability of a comparison involving Nazis or Hitler approaches 1.” In other words, Godwin put forth the sarcastic observation that, given enough time, all discussions—regardless of topic or scope—inevitably end up being about Hitler and the Nazis.

Godwin’s law is often cited in online discussions as a deterrent against the use of arguments in the widespread reductio ad Hitlerum form. The rule does not make any statement about whether any particular reference or comparison to Adolf Hitler or the Nazis might be appropriate, but only asserts that the likelihood of such a reference or comparison arising increases as the discussion progresses. It is precisely because such a comparison or reference may sometimes be appropriate, Godwin has argued that overuse of Nazi and Hitler comparisons should be avoided, because it robs the valid comparisons of their impact.

Although in one of its early forms Godwin’s law referred specifically to Usenet newsgroup discussions, the law is now often applied to any threaded online discussion, such as chat rooms and blog comment threads, and has been invoked for the inappropriate use of Nazi analogies in articles or speeches.

CafePress
“But I’m Pretty Sure You’re Not Hitler” Gifts

NYTimes.com - Media Decoder
September 16, 2010, 11:37 pm
Jon Stewart Plans to Rally Against Extremism
By BILL CARTER
Jon Stewart announced his much-awaited “big announcement” on Thursday’s edition of his late-night program, “The Daily Show.” He plans to stage a rally in Washington to counter what he identified as extremists on either side of the political spectrum.

Mr. Stewart told his audience the show had secured the National Mall on Oct. 30 for what he called “The Rally to Restore Sanity.”
(...)
Mr. Stewart also promised to supply the crowd with signs if they did not bring their own, including as examples, “I Disagree With You, But I’m Pretty Sure You’re Not Hitler,” and “Take It Down a Notch for America.”

Some Guy With a Website
September 17, 2010
A slightly more positive Washington, DC blog post
Holy shit this sounds awesome.

Last night, Stewart announced he will host the “Rally To Restore Sanity” on the Washington Mall on October 30. The central message of the event, which Stewart also characterized as the “Million Moderate March,” will be “Take It Down A Notch—For America.” Featured signs will include reasonable maxims, such as, “I Disagree With You, But I’m Pretty Sure You’re Not Hitler.”

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityGovernment/Law/Politics/Military • (0) Comments • Friday, October 15, 2010 • Permalink