A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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Entry from September 24, 2008
Hurricane Cocktail (Hurricane Punch)

The Hurricane Cocktail is said to have been invented at Pat O’Brien’s in New Orleans, a bar that began in 1933. Whiskey had been in short supply during World War II, but rum was readily available in New Orleans. The Hurricane Cocktail consists of lime juice, passion fruit syrup and rum.

Trademark records appear to show that Pat O’Brien’s trademarked Hurricane glasses in 1941 and Hurricane mix in 1944.

A Hurricane Punch recipe appears in a Ronrico Rum publication from 1941. Hurricane Punch often substitutes other fruit juices for passion fruit. “Hurricane” drinks are popular in New Orleans and wherever else that hurricanes are frequent, such as the Texas Gulf Coast.


Wikipedia: Hurricane (cocktail)
The hurricane is an extremely sweet alcoholic drink made from lime juice, passion fruit syrup and rum. It is one of many popular drinks served in New Orleans.

The creation of this passion fruit-colored relative of a Daiquiri drink is credited to New Orleans tavern owner Pat O’Brien. In the 1940s, he needed to get rid of all of the rum that local distributors forced him to buy before he could get a few cases of other spirits. He poured the concoction into hurricane-lamp-shaped glasses and gave it away to sailors. The drink caught on, and it has been a mainstay in the French Quarter ever since.

The hurricane is also the local name of a different cocktail on the islands of the Bahamas. The drink is composed of various measures of coffee liqueur, Rum 151, irish cream and Grand Marnier, and is commonly found in the bars in and around downtown Nassau.

Pat O’Brien’s
How to Make an authentic Pat O’Brien’s Hurricane
In a 26 oz. Hurricane glass, mix
4 oz. of Pat O’Brien’s Hurricane Rum or a good dark Rum and
4 oz. of Pat O’Brien’s Hurricane Mix

Fill with crushed ice, and
Garnish with an orange and cherry.

Pat O’Brien’s
The Original Pat O’Brien’s Hurricane
A visit to Pat O’Brien’s is not complete without a world-famous Hurricane!

How do you make a Hurricane?

Served in a Pat O’Brien’s logo glass and garnished with an orange slice and a cherry, the fruity red concoction was created during World War II when liquor such as whiskey was in low supply. In order to purchase just one case of these liquors, liquor salesmen forced bar owners to purchase as much as 50 cases of rum, which was plentiful. In an effort to use the abundance of rum that Pat O’Brien’s acquired, the recipe for the Hurricane evolved with the help of an eager liquor salesman. The name came soon after when a glass shaped like a hurricane lamp was used to serve the fruity rum cocktail.

The Pat O’Brien’s Hurricane glass is one of the most sought-after souvenirs in New Orleans. Many New Orleanians have one or more in their possession, and as for what they do with those glasses once they get home, one Pat O’Brien’s patron pointed out, “A Pat O’s Hurricane glass can hold exactly $10.00 in pennies.”

Google Books
The Rum Connoisseur:
Chico Presents Food and Drink Recipes Using Famous Ronrico Rum

By Ronrico Corporation (San Juan, P.R.), P.R. Ronrico Corporation (San Juan
Published by Ronrico Corporation
1941
Page 15
Hurricane Punch
1 oz. lime juice
1 oz. lemon juice
2 oz. Passion Fruit syrup 4 oz. ...

Key to New Orleans
by Margaret Whitmore
San Francisco, CA: Welcome House Publications
1956
Pg. 98: 
However, Pat’s (Pat O’Brien’s, 718 St. Peter St.—ed.) is known continent-wide for his own invention, “The Hurricane”—4 ounces of rum, passion fruit juice, etc., served in a full-sized hurricane glass. If you aren’t up to that you can have a Squall (only 2 ounces of rum) or even a Breeze (one ounce of rum).

Google Books
A well-intentioned reporter becomes a story chaser in love with the joie de vivre of one man, Pat O’Brien. Inventor of the Hurricane cocktail. Proprietor of the world-famous Pat O’Brien’s bar. Godfather of the French Quarter of New Orleans. Three decades after the Dixie Mafia robbed and shot down the O’Brien family, the author cruises in the Dove across Lake Pontchartrain to interview Pat’s daughter but finds her suffering inside the family’s fortressed estate. Surrounded by moral decay, addiction and unreliable sources, the author, often inebriated herself, struggles to stay focused, and be as respectful as a noble savage can be. Sometimes her sarcasm and inner ramblings take control where the facts leave her stranded. Which is where her gonzo adventures begin as a storm brews in pursuit of Pat O’Brien.

More details
In Pursuit of Pat O’Brien
By Tami Hotard
Published by Helm Publishing (IL), 2006
ISBN 0979232805, 9780979232800
328 pages

Art of Drink
The Hurricane Cocktail
Darcy O’Neil
January 25, 2006 9:10 AM
This is a classic cocktail that is fruity and strong with the two star ingredients being rum and passion fruit. With other fruit juices added, this drink comes out like a type of fruit punch, with a big alcohol kick. It is believed that the drink was first created in 1939 at the Hurricane Bar in New York, but was made famous by Pat O’Brien in New Orleans. If you are in the mood for something tropical but are tired of Mai Tai’s and Singapore Slings, give this cocktail a shot.

As the story goes, it was difficult to procure whisky during World War II, but the proximity of New Orleans to the Caribbean made rum very easy to get. The Hurricane Cocktail was served in a large glass that was shaped, and named after the old hurricane lamps.

Like other drinks created in the 1930’s and 1940’s, the recipes have been changed and modified over time. The original Hurricane recipe can be hard to find due to all of the changes. Even Emeril Lagasse, a popular New Orleans chef and TV host, has a version that is just a combination of fruit juices, and the use of passion fruit juice is optional (his recipe calls for grenadine in place of the passion fruit). I believed that the true unique ingredient in a Hurricane is passion fruit, and without it, is just another fruit punch.

Basic Hurricane Cocktail Recipe
1 1/2 oz. each of light and dark rum
1oz. passion fruit syrup
3/4 oz. lime juice

Complex Hurricane Cocktail Recipe
1.5 ounces light rum
1.5 ounces dark rum
1 ounce orange juice
1 ounce fresh lime juice (NOT Rose’s or RealLime)
1/4 cup passion fruit juice, or 1 tablespoon passion fruit syrup
1 teaspoon superfine sugar
1 teaspoon grenadine
Cherries with stems, and orange slice to garnish
Ice cubes

There is an older recipe for a Hurricane that can be found in vintage cocktail books that is made using Cognac, Absinthe and Vodka.

(Trademark)
Word Mark PAT O’BRIEN’S
Goods and Services IC 021. US 002 033. G & S: GLASSWARE, NAMELY, DRINKING GLASSES. FIRST USE: 19411231. FIRST USE IN COMMERCE: 19411231
IC 042. US 100 107. G & S: RESTAURANT AND NIGHTCLUB SERVICES. FIRST USE: 19411231. FIRST USE IN COMMERCE: 19411231
Mark Drawing Code (1) TYPED DRAWING
Serial Number 73658980
Filing Date May 1, 1987
Current Filing Basis 1A
Original Filing Basis 1A
Published for Opposition June 12, 1990
Registration Number 1612108
Registration Date September 4, 1990
Owner (REGISTRANT) PAT O’BRIEN’S BAR, INC. CORPORATION LOUISIANA 718 ST. PETER STREET NEW ORLEANS LOUISIANA 70116
Attorney of Record Jeffrey M. Becker; David Bell; Alan Herda; Purvi Patel; Leanne Stendell
Prior Registrations 1270985
Type of Mark TRADEMARK. SERVICE MARK
Register PRINCIPAL
Affidavit Text SECT 15. SECT 8 (6-YR). SECTION 8(10-YR) 20000823.
Renewal 1ST RENEWAL 20000823
Other Data THE NAME “PAT O’BRIEN” IS NOT THAT OF A LIVING INDIVIDUAL.
Live/Dead Indicator LIVE

(Trademark)
Word Mark PAT O’BRIEN’S
Goods and Services IC 032. US 045. G & S: NON-ALCOHOLIC COCKTAIL MIXES. FIRST USE: 19440000. FIRST USE IN COMMERCE: 19440000
Mark Drawing Code (1) TYPED DRAWING
Serial Number 73658981
Filing Date May 1, 1987
Current Filing Basis 1A
Original Filing Basis 1A
Published for Opposition June 12, 1990
Registration Number 1612267
Registration Date September 4, 1990
Owner (REGISTRANT) PAT O’BRIEN’S BAR, INC. CORPORATION LOUISIANA 718 ST. PETER STREET NEW ORLEANS LOUISIANA 70116
Attorney of Record Jeffrey M. Becker; David Bell; Alan Herda; Purvi Patel; Leanne Stendell
Prior Registrations 1270985
Type of Mark TRADEMARK
Register PRINCIPAL
Affidavit Text SECT 15. SECT 8 (6-YR). SECTION 8(10-YR) 20000802.
Renewal 1ST RENEWAL 20000802
Live/Dead Indicator LIVE

Posted by Barry Popik
Texas (Lone Star State Dictionary) • (1) Comments • Wednesday, September 24, 2008 • Permalink


Barry,
I’d love to see that Ronrico book, is it possible to scan or copy it?  See, I’ve been researching the Hurricane for awhile, I’m with the Museum of the American Cocktail, also in New Orleans.

I am also a trademark attorney, and I wanted to clarify a couple of things here.  You wrote:  “Trademark records appear to show that Pat O’Brien’s trademarked Hurricane glasses in 1941 and Hurricane mix in 1944.” Maybe, but not necessarily.  The trademark records indicate that Pat O’s registered the name Pat O’Brien’s as a trademark in 1990 for use of that name (and not the name Hurricane), and the “date of first use” given was December 31, 1941.  In other words, the term Pat O’Brien’s first appeared on glasses at the end of 1941.  It doesn’t necessarily have anything to do with the Hurricane or that glass.  It’s just the name Pat O’Brien’s on ANY glass. 

Second, the other trademark, also registered in 1990, shows that Pat O’s began to sell non-alcoholic cocktail mixes in 1944.  Maybe they were Hurricane mixes, maybe some other mixes, who knows?

But aside from these points, this is very interesting, thanks for your research!

Phil Greene

Posted by phil greene  on  10/20  at  12:31 PM

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