A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

Recent entries:
“If you have ever eaten chocolate money, you have bit coins” (10/18)
“A quesadilla is essentially a grilled cheese sandwich” (10/18)
“Why did the Jewish man walk into a stop sign?"/"He wasn’t an observant Jew.” (10/18)
“Speed bumps are just expensive inverted potholes” (10/18)
“If you have ever eaten chocolate money, you have bit coins” (10/18)
More new entries...

A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z


Entry from September 21, 2011
Hamburger with everything; Hot Dog with everything; Pizza with everything

A food with “everything” means with lots of additions piled onto it.

This post is based on the work of Ben Zimmer and his September 20, 2011 Language Log article, “Shel Silverstein and the domain of ‘everything.’” Victor Steinbok and Garson O’Toole also added contributions on the American Dialect Society list.


Hamburger with everything
21 June 1937, Washington (DC) Post_, “In Hollywood” with Jimmie Fidler, pg. 14, col. 3:
Ann Sothern is a “hamburger with everything, please” addict.

Hot dog with everything
25 July 1936, Bradford (PA) Era, “As the Parade Passes” by Tom Gee, pg. 2, col. 3:
A young man whom we know has cherished since childhood an impish desire to walk with considerable dignity into one of the sedate dining rooms of the Waldorf Astoria and after due deliberation, in response to the inquiring stare of an aloof waiter, say quite loudly and with conviction: “I’ll have a hot dog with everything on it. And, oh yes, wrap up two to go!”

19 October 1938, Salt Lake Tribune (Salt Lake City, UT), “In Hollywood” with Jimmie Fidler, pg. 10, col. 1:
Studies in incongruity: Marie Wilson, swanky in a dazzling cloth-of-silver evening gown, munching a hot dog with everything at Jungle Bill’s roadside stand.

Pizza with everything
15 April 1953, Hartford (CT) Courant, “Pass the Pizza, Pappy”:
But we hope not. because an “everything-on-it” pizza is one that should he worked up to gradually, after long apprenticeship.

27 May 1953, Hartford (CT) Courant, “Requiescat in Pizza”:
We have no doubt that legislators whose hungry, wan looks, have been dissipated by pizzas (with everything on them, including anchovies and mushrooms.

5 Marchy 1954, Christian Science Monitor, pg. 17, col. 4:
There was Pizza with mushrooms, Pizza with tomatoes, Pizza with this and Pizza with that, Pizza with the other—quite a lengthy list, concluding with the triumphant line in capital letters, “PIZZA WITH EVERYTHING.”

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityFood/Drink • (0) Comments • Wednesday, September 21, 2011 • Permalink