A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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Entry from February 22, 2012
All Dressed Hot Dog

Entry in progress—B.P.

Montreal (Canada) is known for its “all dressed” bagel, “all dressed” hot dog and “all dressed” pizza.

“All dressed” has been cited in print since at least 1977.

Google News Archive
29 July 1977, The Gazette (Montreal, Quebec), “State of steamie: A report” by Nigel Gibson, pg. 3, col. 2:
“What do you mean you found the best steamie in Montreal and dare return empty handed,” he roared. “Four stimes all dressed and a large spruce beer and make it snappy.”

4 July 1998, The Record (Kitchener, Ontario), “Canada finds its tongue” by Howard Richtler, pg. C5: 
Dining in Canada can also be a distinct experience. You will not find any of these words in non-Canadian dictionaries: poutine, tourtiere, all-dressed, or smoked meat.

Canada.com
Montreal english grows even more distinct
How different is Montreal English from the English spoken elsewhere in Canada?
By The Gazette (Montreal)
November 15, 2008
How different is Montreal English from the English spoken elsewhere in Canada?

The first reaction of many people would doubtless be: “Just a few words here and there.” Depanneur is the most obvious example: You’d never catch someone in Toronto or Vancouver saying she was off to buy milk at the dep.

“All-dressed” is another local idiom. We use the phrase to mean a food item garnished with everything available, and seldom, if ever, do we order a supreme pizza or a loaded burger. But outside Quebec, Canadians tend to restrict “all dressed” to clothing.

PostCity.com (Toronto)
May 3, 2011
10:40 AM
The Big Chill gets a little sister with The Little Dog, a pocket-sized haven for hot dog connoisseurs on College
By Jon Sufrin
(...)
Offerings include Nathans dogs (New York-style, $3.49), Chicago 58 dogs (Coney Island-style $3.49), and, in what could be a Toronto first, the Montreal steamie ($1.99), a tiny Lesters hot dog that traditionally comes served all-dressed with cole slaw, mustard and onions. 

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityFood/Drink • (0) Comments • Wednesday, February 22, 2012 • Permalink