A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

Recent entries:
“Finish your salad. A thousand islands died to make that dressing” (12/12)
Entry forthcoming—B.P. (12/12)
“I’ve never understood the point in fire blankets” (joke) (12/12)
“It’s okay password, I’m insecure too” (12/12)
“How many frat boys does it take to change a light bulb?"/"None, they prefer natural light.” (12/12)
More new entries...

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Entry from August 21, 2015
“A tenement house in Greenwood” (soup with greens)

New York City had some unusual restaurant slang in the 19th century. This term was heard on the Bowery and appeared in the New York (NY) Herald in 1888:

“That ‘a tenement house in Greenwood’ meant a plate of soup with plenty of greens in it.”

“Greenwood” is used for “greens,” but there is no evidence that this plate of soup has anything in particular to do with Greenwood Heights, Brooklyn.


15 April 1888, The Sunday Herald (Boston, MA), pg. 17, col. 6:
RESTAURANT SLANG.
During his stay in a cheap Bowery restaurant a New York Herald reporter learned several things he never knew before. Among others:
(...)
That “a tenement house in Greenwood” meant a plate of soup with plenty of greens in it.

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityFood/Drink • Friday, August 21, 2015 • Permalink