A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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Entry from May 17, 2015
“You must continue to gain expertise, but avoid thinking like an expert”

"Develop all the expertise you can, but avoid thinking like an expert” is the advice that was given in Winning the Innovation Game (1989) by Denis Waitley and Robert B. Tucker. Waitley further explained in Empires of the Mind: Lessons To Lead And Succeed In A Knowledge-Based World (1996):

“The most compelling reason to avoid thinking like an expert even while continuing to acquire expertise is that your assumptions may damage your ability to generate and work with new ideas.”

Waitley’s “you must continue to gain expertise, but avoid thinking like an expert” line of advice has been frequently cited.


Wikipedia: Denis Waitley
Denis E. Waitley (born 1933), is an American motivational speaker and writer, consultant and best-selling author.

Waitley was a member on the Usana Health Sciences board of directors until 2007, when it emerged that he had lied about holding a Master’s degree from the U.S. Naval Academy, and held a PhD from an unaccredited diploma mill. He was a founding member of the National Council for Self-Esteem.

He has authored 16 books and has released hundreds of audio lectures.

Google Books
Winning the Innovation Game
By Denis Waitley and Robert B. Tucker
New York, NY: Berkley Books
1989
Pg. 77:
1. Develop all the expertise you can, but
2. Avoid thinking like an expert.
(...)
Avoid thinking like an expert: While there are dangers in trying to innovate without knowing your field thoroughly, there are, likewise, dangers in thinking of yourself as an expert, ...

Google Books
Empires of the Mind:
Lessons To Lead And Succeed In A Knowledge-Based World

By Denis Waitley
New York, NY: William Morrow
1996
Pg. 14:
You must continue to gain expertise, but avoid thinking like an expert.

The acquisition of knowledge is a lifelong experience, not a collection of facts or skills.
Pg. 15:
The most compelling reason to avoid thinking like an expert even while continuing to acquire expertise is that your assumptions may damage your ability to generate and work with new ideas.

Twitter
Jim Reck
‏@jreck
“You must continue to gain expertise, but avoid thinking like an expert.”~Denis Waitley
4:55 PM - 2 Apr 2009

Google Books
Naked Forex:
High-Probability Techniques for Trading without Indicators

By Alex Nekritin and Walter Peters, Ph.D
Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
2012
Pg. ?:
You need to continue to gain expertise, but avoid thinking like an expert. —Denis Waitley

Google Books
Culture Compass
6th Edition

By Robert Long
Lulu.com
2014
Pg. 50:
“You must continue to gain expertise, but avoid thinking like an expert.” – Denis Waitley

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityWork/Businesses • Sunday, May 17, 2015 • Permalink