A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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Entry from April 11, 2005
Wicked Hot Chocolate & Wicked Fun Bonbons
Jacques Torres was the pastry chef at Le Cirque. In December 2000, he opened a chocolate factory in Brooklyn, and in the fall of 2004 he opened another one at King Street and Hudson Street in Manhattan.

"Wicked Hot Chocolate" is his hot chocolate with chili peppers. He also makes "Wicked Fun" bonbons. (There is no connection to the Broadway show Wicked.) The "wicked" line was introduced in 2001 and figures to do wicked business for some time to come.

http://www.mrchocolate.com/ecom/site/product.cfm?id=555649C2-C09F-0662-D2EB9611CB98F98D
Hot Chocolate
Our Hot Hot Chocolate is an instant best seller! Jacques makes it with real chocolate - never cocoa powder. The result...a thick rich creamy hot chocolate that bursts with flavor. Feeling daring? Try the Wicked Hot Chocolate that features allspice, cinnamon, ground sweet ancho chili peppers, and smoked ground chipolt chili peppers!

(GOOGLE GROUPS)
Fan fund winner!
... i went there. i almost orgasmed from the Wicked Hot Chocolate made with Ancho and Chipolte peppers, cinnamon, sugar and cocoa solids. thick like pudding. ...
alt.polyamory - Sep 9 2002, 5:34 am by songbird - 39 messages - 20 authors

16 November 2001, NBC News: Today
Interview: Food columnist Phil Lempert shows new products from the Fourth Annual Chocolate Show

ANN CURRY reporting: Everybody loves comfort food, perhaps now more than ever, and for many people chocolate probably tops the list. Well, TODAY contributor Phil Lempert has had one of the most comfortable assignments of the week, and he's here to tell us about it and also he brought some samples.

Phil, good morning.

Mr. PHIL LEMPERT (Syndicated Food Columnist): Good morning, Ann. It was a terrific, sweet assignment, I've got to tell you something. Fourth Annual Chocolate Show in New York, went down there, saw this great fashion show, women wearing wonderful chocolate, and--and a man wearing chocolate. Also tasted some absolutely wonderful products. And in fact, I'm bringing you back a look at what we saw yesterday.
(...)
Mr. LEMPERT: And this is from Jacques Torres. And this is a wicked hot, hot chocolate. He uses a whole blend of different spices, two different chili peppers, a hot...

CURRY: Mm, yum.

Mr. LEMPERT: Isn't that--isn't that wonderful? It's an absolutely terrific product.

10 March 2002, New York Times, "Chocolate Works Its Charm on the Brooklyn Waterfront" by Tina Kelley, section 3, pg. 5, col. 2:
For Mr. Torres, the former executive pastry chef at Le Cirque 2000, the pressures of managing a chocolate factory and retail store are a relative cakewalk compared with the long hours and relentless reviews that come with performing at a top-rated restaurant.

Mr. Torres, who grew up in Provence, decided in December 2000 that he needed a change from the restaurant business. Together with Ken Gotto, his sous chef, and Kris Kruid, his partner at home and at work, he opened his store and factory on the Brooklyn waterfront between the Brooklyn and Manhattan bridges.
(...)
The intersection of chocolate and messing around, if not full-scale love, is evident in the retail store, which shares 66 Water Street with the factory. The store sells concoctions like Wicked Hot Chocolate (with ancho and chipotle chilis, supposed aphrodisiacs) and Body Butter (''Don't make us give you directions,'' the label says).

1 October 2002, Smart Money, pg. 138:
GOURMET: Wicked Good This Halloween, rather than raid your kid's trick-or-treat bag, create a goodie stash designed for the grown-up palate. Jacques Torres, host of the Food Network's Chocolate with Jacques Torres, has just expanded his line of handmade chocolates. The new Wicked Fun bonbons ($10 per quarter pound) -- dark chocolate ganache seasoned with a subtle blend of chipotle peppers and ancho chili -- will quickly make you forget that Butterfinger you were coveting. Torres says Mexicans were mixing chocolate and spices centuries ago, and the concept has "always scared me, but interested me. If it's too hot, it doesn't taste good." To wash them down, try his Hot Chocolate gift set ($40), with classic and "wicked" cocoa, as well as chocolate-covered marsh-mallows (all at http://www.mrchocolate.com). -- Noah Rothbaum

21 February 2005, U.S. News & World Report, pg. 76:
BUY IT
Wicked Hot Chocolate. $16, mrchocolate.com (from celeb chef Jacques Torres).
MIX IT
Boil milk, whip in choco-powder with spices, sweet chili, smoky chipotle.
SIP IT
Thick and tangy, this is hot chocolate for grown-ups.
Posted by Barry Popik
Food/Drink • (0) Comments • Monday, April 11, 2005 • Permalink