A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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Entry from November 03, 2013
“Vinegar (wine’s angry brother)”

The novelist Tom Bobbins wrote in his book Villa Incognito (2003):

“The mystery of mayonnaise—and others besides Dickie Goldwire have surely puzzled over this—is how egg yolks, vegetable oil, vinegar (wine’s angry brother), ... ”

The lengthy passage has been frequently quoted.


Wikipedia: Tom Robbins
Thomas Eugene “Tom” Robbins (born July 22, 1936) is an American author. His best-selling novels are “seriocomedies” (also known as “comedy-drama"), often wildly poetic stories with a strong social and philosophical undercurrent, an irreverent bent, and scenes extrapolated from carefully researched bizarre facts.[citation needed] His novel Even Cowgirls Get the Blues was made into a movie in 1993 by Gus Van Sant and stars Uma Thurman, Lorraine Bracco, and Keanu Reeves.

Google Books
Villa Incognito
By Tom Robbins
New York, NY: Bantam Dell
2003
Pg. 98:
The mystery of mayonnaise—and others besides Dickie Goldwire have surely puzzled over this—is how egg yolks, vegetable oil, vinegar (wine’s angry brother), ...

4chadata.org
Anonymous 2013-05-10 01:27:42 No.4466290
(...)
“The mystery of mayonnaise – and others besides Dickie Goldwire have surely puzzled over this - is how egg yolks, vegetable oil, vinegar (wine’s angry brother), salt, sugar (earth’s primal grin-energy), lemon juice, water, and, naturally, a pinch of the ol’ calcium disodium EDTA could be combined in such a way as to produce a condiment, so versatile, satisfying, and outright majestic that mustard, ketchup and their ilk must bow down before it (though at two bucks a jar, mayonnaise certainly doesn’t put on airs) or else slink away in disgrace. Who but the French could have wrought this gastronomic miracle? Mayonnaise is France’s gift to the New World’s muddled palate, a boon that combines humanity’s ancient instinctive craving for the cellular warmth of pure fat with the modern, romantic fondness for complex flavors: mayo (as the lazy call it) may appear mild and prosaic, but behind it’s creamy veil it fairly seethes with tangy disposition. Cholesterol aside, it projects the luster that we astro-orphans have identified with well-being ever since we fell from the stars.”

from Terra Incognito

MetaFilter
“... this alchemist in a jar.”
July 19, 2013 6:45 AM
“The mystery of mayonnaise… is how egg yolks, vegetable oil, vinegar (wine’s angry brother) salt, sugar (earth’s primal grin-energy), lemon juice, water, and naturally, a pinch of the ol’ calcium disodium EDTA could be combined in such a way to produce a condiment so versatile, satisfying, and outright majestic, that mustard, ketchup and their ilk must bow down before it (though, at two bucks a jar, mayonnaise certainly doesn’t put on airs) or else slink away in disgrace. Who but the French could have wrought this gastronomic miracle? Mayonnaise is France’s gift to the New World’s muddled palate, a boon that combines humanity’s ancient instinctive craving for the cellular warmth of pure fat with the modern, romantic fondness for complex flavors: mayo (as the lazy call it) may appear mild and prosaic, but behind its creamy veil it fairly seethes with tangy disposition. Cholesterol aside, it projects the luster that we astro-orphans have identified with well-being ever since we fell from the stars.”

The Frictionary
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 03, 2013
The Frictionary # 503
(...)
4549. Vinegar: wine’s angry brother. (Tom Robbins)

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityFood/Drink • Sunday, November 03, 2013 • Permalink