A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

Recent entries:
“If you have ever eaten chocolate money, you have bit coins” (10/18)
“A quesadilla is essentially a grilled cheese sandwich” (10/18)
Entry forthcoming—B.P. (10/18)
“Speed bumps are just expensive inverted potholes” (10/18)
“If you have ever eaten chocolate money, you have bit coins” (10/18)
More new entries...

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Entry from April 26, 2008
“Those whom the gods love they let live in Texas”

"Those whom the gods love they let live in Texas” is a proverb cited in a 1904 book (below). Other citations for this proverb have not been found; however, other citations for another proverb listed in this same passage have been found.


Google Books
From the Alamo to San Jacinto
or, The Grito

a novel by Moncure Lyne
New York, NY: R. F. Fenno & Company
1904
Pg. 11:
The Mexicans are a people of proverbs. Like seaweed on the ocean of their polite speeches, whose surf seldom touches any grain of sincerity, float numerous adages, some of which attract attention, as, “Those whom the gods love they let live in Texas;” and that other maxim voicing the sentiment that, “Having once tasted the waters of the San Antonio River, one will return to quaff more.”

Posted by Barry Popik
Texas (Lone Star State Dictionary) • (0) Comments • Saturday, April 26, 2008 • Permalink