A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

Recent entries:
“If your boss refuses to pay you more money, no problem. Just accuse them of raise-ism” (8/15)
“What do you call a Russian tree that grows meat?"/"Dimitri.” (8/15)
“If a crab were employed in a pizza parlor, in which station would it work? A crust station.” (8/15)
“How do you make Swiss cheese?"/"With a holey cow.” (8/15)
“Is a subpar golfer good or bad?” (8/15)
More new entries...

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Entry from February 12, 2007
“The sun has riz, the sun has set, and here we is in Texas yet”

"The sun has riz, the sun has set, and here we is in Texas yet” shows how large Texas is. These lines are said to have been written by a hobo in the early 1900s.

Compare these verses to the “Brooklyn National Anthem” (or “Bronx National Anthem") of the same period. ("Spring is sprung, the grass is riz, I wonder where the flowers is.")


Google Books
One Clear Call
by Upton Sinclair
New York: Viking Press
1948
Pg. 351:
“The sun has riz, the sun has set, and here we is in Texas yet.”

Google Groups
Green Pastures
by Dorothy Williams
Xlibris Corporation
2001
Pg. 96:
We were in Texas now—the signs all said so, cautioning us to “Drive Friendly.” Rod kept repeating an old corny phrase he has picked up somewhere. “The sun is risen, the sun is set, and we ain’t out of Texas yet.”

30STM Bulletin Board
PesticidePrincess
Apr 4 2005, 03:57 PM
Texas is about as varied a state as you can get… we have everything from swamp to desert. It also takes 12+ hours to drive from one side to the other across the longest part. Thus the saying “The sun has risen. The sun has set, and I ain’t out of Texas yet.”

Fanway.com
Monday, August 15, 2005
That’s a long road when you consider the old Texas saying “the sun has risen and the sun has set and I aint out of Texas yet.”

Hug the Panda
Monday, September 18, 2006
The road to Seattle...
I’m not sure who I first heard this from, I think it was my grandma:
“The sun has risen and the sun has set, and we’re not out of Texas yet!”

19 September 1933, Daily Oklahoman (Oklahoma City, OK), pg. 7, col. 4:
“I’m from Texas, fella—west Texas, and I’m going back tomorrow. He grinned when he said it. He reminded one of the jingle a tramp wrote on a boxcar: “The sun has ris’, the sun has set, and here I am in Texas yet.”

12 September 1942, Lethbridge (Alberta, Canada) Herald, pg. 11, col. 5: 
BIG AS ALBERTA
The sun has riz,
The sun has set,
And here we is
In Texas yet.

4 October 1961, Arizona Daily Sun, pg. 1, col. 2:
“The sun is riz, the sun is set, and her I is in this tree yet.”

14 November 1965, Port Arthur (TX) News, pg. 4, col. 6:
First poem written by a Texas traveler:
“The sun has riz,
The sun has set—
And here I iz
In Texas yet.”

4 August 1974, Port Arthur (TX) News, pg. 9C, col. 2:
Out of Alpine on the route to Van Horn he notes, “The sun has riz, the sun has set, and here we is, in Texas yet.”

21 December 1981, Elyria (OH) Chronicle-Telegram, pg.  34? 
An old Texas jingle is “The sun is riz, the sun is set, and we ain’t out of Texas yet!” Texas is big!

10 July 1999, Gettysburg (PA) Times, pg. B7:
An old Texas Jingle is “the sun is riz, the sun is set, and we ain’t out of Texas yet.” It is the second largest state in area, after Alaska.

Posted by Barry Popik
Texas (Lone Star State Dictionary) • (0) Comments • Monday, February 12, 2007 • Permalink