A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

Recent entries:
“Better days are just around the corner. They are called Friday, Saturday and Sunday” (3/29)
“Nothing screws up your Friday like realizing it’s only Thursday” (3/29)
Entry forthcoming—B.P. (3/29)
Entry forthcoming—B.P. (3/29)
“New York leads all cities in the number of people around whom you shouldn’t make a sudden move” (3/29)
More new entries...

A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z


Entry from August 28, 2010
“The Fed can print money, but it can’t print jobs”

Television economist and blogger Lawrence “Larry “ Kudlow’s “Kudlow Money Politics” (National Review Online) article was titled “The Fed Can’t Print Jobs” on August 10, 2010, at 5:18 p.m. Kudlow’s CNBC blog was titled “The Fed Can Print More Money, But It Can’t Print Jobs” on August 10, 2010, at 5:48 p.m. The saying “The Fed can’t print jobs” was picked up by several websites, crediting Kudlow.

The saying fit the so-called “jobless recovery” of 2010, when the Federal Reserve printed money but unemployment still remained high. The saying means that there are limits on what the Federal Reserve can do to improve the economy. Economist Stephen Moore repeated the saying on the Fox News television show On the Record on August 27, 2010, adding that if merely printing money put people to work, various third world economies would be healthier than they actually are.


Wikipedia: Lawrence Kudlow
Lawrence “Larry” Kudlow (born August 20, 1947), is an American supply-side economist, television personality, and newspaper columnist. He is the host of CNBC’s The Kudlow Report. As a syndicated columnist, his articles appear in numerous U.S. newspapers and web sites, including his own blog, Kudlow’s Money Politic$.

Wikipedia: Federal Reserve System
The Federal Reserve System (also known as the Federal Reserve, and informally as the Fed) is the central banking system of the United States. It was created in 1913 with the enactment of the Federal Reserve Act, and was largely a response to a series of financial panics, particularly a severe panic in 1907. Over time, the roles and responsibilities of the Federal Reserve System have expanded and its structure has evolved. Events such as the Great Depression were major factors leading to changes in the system. Its duties today, according to official Federal Reserve documentation, are to conduct the nation’s monetary policy, supervise and regulate banking institutions, maintain the stability of the financial system and provide financial services to depository institutions, the U.S. government, and foreign official institutions.

National Review Online - Kudlow’s Money Politics
The Fed Can’t Print Jobs
By Larry Kudlow
August 10, 2010 5:18 P.M.
(...)
But here’s the central problem. The Fed can print more money, but it can’t print jobs — or capital formation, or productivity. With a trillion dollars of excess bank reserves already in the system, there’s no shortage of money. The recovery is being held up by the tax-and-regulatory threats and anti-business attitude coming out of Washington.

CNBC.com - Larry Kudlow Blog
The Fed Can Print More Money, But It Can’t Print Jobs
Published: Tuesday, 10 Aug 2010 | 5:48 PM ET
By: Larry Kudlow
CNBC Anchor
(...)
But here’s the central problem. The Fed can print more money, but it can’t print jobs — or capital formation, or productivity. With a trillion dollars of excess bank reserves already in the system, there’s no shortage of money. The recovery is being held up by the tax-and-regulatory threats and anti-business attitude coming out of Washington.

TheStreet
Kass: ‘Fast Money Halftime Report’ Recap
By Doug Kass
08/16/10 - 02:00 PM EDT
(...)
The Fed can print money, but it can’t print jobs. We need some combination of a transformative and focused jobs program, a cut in taxes and a simplification of the financial and health care regulatory initiatives.

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityBanking/Finance/Insurance • (0) Comments • Saturday, August 28, 2010 • Permalink