A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

Recent entries:
“Tuesday is just Monday’s ugly sister” (3/27)
“Happiness is having a rare steak, a bottle of whisky—and a dog to eat the rare steak” (3/27)
“What whiskey will not cure, there is no cure for” (3/27)
“Good girls are made of sugar and spice. Country girls are made of whiskey on ice” (3/27)
“This whiskey tastes like I’m about to tell you how I really feel” (3/27)
More new entries...

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Entry from April 15, 2013
“The currency is the share price of a country”

"Think of the currency as the share price of a country” was cited in Newsweek on June 23, 2002. The analogy has become popular and has been frequently cited in the financial media. “The old saying is that the currency is the share price of a country” was cited in April 15, 2003.


Newsweek magazine
Landing Soon
Jun 23, 2002 8:00 PM EDT
(...)
Think of the currency as the share price of a country. Investors like to buy growth stocks like Microsoft because that growth leads to rising share prices. But when growth stocks overshoot and get too expensive, investors switch into defensive stocks—safe, steady plays like utilities. That’s what is happening in the stock market right now, and something similar is happening in the currency markets, as investors shift money from dollars into gold, Swiss francs and euros.

Bloomberg.com
Euro Gains as ECB’s Trichet Says European Economy Is `Sound’
By Ron Harui - February 11, 2008 03:02 EST
(...)
“The currency is the share price of a country,” said George Glynos, managing director of Johannesburg-based Econometrix Treasury Management, which advises investors on bond and foreign-exchange holdings.

SkyscraperCity
Octoman
February 13th, 2009, 10:39 PM
PPP adjusts for different levels of inflation. When nobody has any inflation isnt it a bit null? If the ‘share price’ of a country is its currency isnt it reasonable to include it in the calculation of its relative worth? Unless of course we think the FX markets are irational.

Daily Crux
October 2010
The Daily Crux Sunday Interview
What you don’t know about gold:
The biggest myths on the gold market

(...)
BRIAN HUNT: A currency is sort of like the share price of a country. Over time, if a country manages its finances well… if it produces more than it consumes, saves plenty of money, and maintains a modest amount of debt, its currency will rise.

SkyscraperCity
annman
March 13th, 2013, 08:47 AM
A currency is effectively the normalised “share price” of a nation’s economy.

Business Day (South Africa)
TALKING TECHNICALS: Rand woes set to intensify
BY GARTH MACKENZIE, APRIL 15 2013, 13:10
(...)
SA’s current account deficit and generally slow rate of growth are major reasons behind the weakness in the rand, and while a weaker rand may benefit some sectors of our economy, it is generally not good for inflation which affects us all. The old saying is that the currency is the share price of a country.

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityBanking/Finance/Insurance • Monday, April 15, 2013 • Permalink