A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

Recent entries:
“What does the military use acid for?"/"To neutralize the enemy base.” (5/24)
“If I had a dollar for every time someone over 40 told me my generation sucks…” (joke) (5/24)
Entry forthcoming—B.P. (5/24)
“Don’t be yourself. Be a pizza. Everyone loves pizza” (5/24)
“Of course I talk to myself. Sometimes I need expert advice” (5/24)
More new entries...

A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z


Entry from March 09, 2010
“That money talks, I’ll not deny, I heard it once: It said, ‘Goodbye‘“

"Money talks” (meaning that money has influence) is an old financial saying, cited in print in various forms to before 1700. American poet and author Richard Armour (1906-1989) wrote the following: 

“That money talks
I won’t deny.
I heard it once.
It said, “Goodbye.”

Although Armour popularized this version of the proverb “money talks,” the following was published in the Philadelphia (PA) Press in 1904:

His Experience.
That “money talks” I’ll not deny
May be quite untrue.
But it more often says “Goodby”
Than “How-dy-do.”
-- Philadelphia Press.


Zazzle.com
If money could talk, it would say goodbye.
t-shirts
Product id: 235470865770504369
Made on 1/10/2008 3:51 PM

Wikipedia: Richard Armour
Richard Willard Armour (July 15, 1906 – February 28, 1989) was an American poet and author who wrote over sixty-five books.
(...)
Armour wrote funny poems in a style reminiscent of Ogden Nash. These poems were often featured in newspaper Sunday supplements in a feature called Armour’s Armory. Many of Armour’s poems have been repeatedly and incorrectly attributed to Nash. Probably Armour’s most-quoted poem (often attributed to Nash) is the quatrain: “Shake and shake / the catsup bottle / first none’ll come / and then a lot’ll.” Another popular quatrain of his, also usually attributed erroneously to Nash, is: “Nothing attracts / the mustard from wieners / as much as the slacks / just back from the cleaners.”

The Gladdest Thing
Money
That money talks
I won’t deny.
I heard it once.
It said, “Goodbye.”
— Richard Armour

16 January 1904, Flint (MI) Journal, pg. 2, col. 4:
His Experience.
That “money talks” I’ll not deny
May be quite untrue.
But it more often says “Goodby”
Than “How-dy-do.”
-- Philadelphia Press.

Google Books
The Accountant, Detroit
v. 5-6 - 1913
Pg. ?:
IF MONEY TALKS,
I WONDER WHY
I ONLY HEAR
IT SAY “GOODBYE?”

Google Books
The Guinness Book of Money
By Leslie Dunkling and Adrian Room
London: Guinness
1990
Pg. 130:
The poet Richard Armour has said:
‘That money talks
I’ll not deny, I heard it once:
It said “Goodbye”.’

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityBanking/Finance/Insurance • Tuesday, March 09, 2010 • Permalink