A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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Entry from April 06, 2012
“Texas will again lift up its head, and stand among the nations” (Sam Houston)

A letter by Sam Houston (1793-1863) to William G. Harding on July 17, 1841 has been frequently reprinted in Texas quotation collections (where the quotation is slightly edited):

“If the next administration shou’d be composed of men possessing patriotism, integrity, and talents, Texas will again lift up its head, and stand among the nations. It ought to do so, for no country upon the Globe can compare with it, in natural advantages. Come and see it!”


Wikipedia: Sam Houston
Samuel “Sam” Houston (March 2, 1793–July 26, 1863), was a nineteenth-century American statesman, politician, and soldier. He was born in Timber Ridge in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia, of Scots-Irish descent. Houston became a key figure in the history of Texas and was elected as the first and third President of the Republic of Texas, U.S. Senator for Texas after it joined the United States, and finally as a governor of the state. He refused to swear loyalty to the Confederacy when Texas seceded from the Union in 1861 with the outbreak of the American Civil War, and was removed from office. To avoid bloodshed, he refused an offer of a Union army to put down the Confederate rebellion. Instead, he retired to Huntsville, Texas, where he died before the end of the Civil War.

His earlier life included migration to Tennessee from Virginia, time spent with the Cherokee Nation (into which he later was adopted as a citizen and took a wife), military service in the War of 1812, and successful participation in Tennessee politics. Houston is the only person in U.S. history to have been the governor of two different states (although other men had served as governors of more than one American territory).

In 1827 Houston was elected Governor of Tennessee as a Jacksonian. In 1829 Houston resigned as Governor and relocated to Arkansas Territory. In 1832 Houston was involved in an altercation with a U.S. Congressman, followed by a high-profile trial. Shortly afterwards he relocated to Coahuila y Tejas, then a Mexican state, and became a leader of the Texas Revolution. Sam Houston supported annexation by the United States. The city of Houston is named after him. Houston’s reputation was honored after his death: posthumous commemoration has included a memorial museum, a U.S. Army base, a national forest, a historical park, a university, and the largest free-standing statue of an American.

Wikiquote: Texas
Unsourced
Texas will again lift its head and stand among the nations. It ought to do so, for no country upon the globe can compare with it in natural advantages.
. Sam Houston, first President of Texas. (Sam Houston Memorial Museum)

TexasBob.com
Texas Quotes
“Texas will again lift it’s head and stand among the nations. It ought to do so, for no country upon the globe can compare with it in natural advantages.” - Sam Houston, War Hero, General, Indian Friend and President of the Republic of Texas.

Google Books
The Writings of Sam Houston, 1813-1863
Volume 3

Edited by Amelia W. Williams and Eugene C. Barker
Austin, TX: The University of Texas Press
1940
Pg. 10:
If the next administration shou’d be composed of men possessing patriotism, integrity, and talents, Texas will again lift up its head, and stand among the nations. It ought to do so, for no country upon the Globe can compare with it, in natural advantages. Come and see it!
(Houston to William G. Harding, July 17, 1841—ed.)

Google Books
1001 Greatest Things Ever Said About Texas
By Donna Ingham
Guilford, CT: Lyons Press
2006
Pg. 18:
Texas will again lift its head and stand among the nations. It ought to do so, for no country upon the globe can compare with it in natural advantages. 
-- Sam Houston

Posted by Barry Popik
Texas (Lone Star State Dictionary) • (0) Comments • Friday, April 06, 2012 • Permalink