A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

Recent entries:
“Starbucks isn’t really that expensive when you consider what Victoria’s Secret charges per cup” (7/25)
“Teacher: ‘Why are you late?’ Student: ‘Why does it matter? You still get paid, right?‘“ (7/25)
“Yoga is my favorite way to pretend to work out” (7/25)
“Work is the greatest thing in the world, so we should always save some of it for tomorrow” (7/25)
“I try to avoid things that make me fat. Like scales, photos and mirrors” (7/25)
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Entry from December 05, 2006
Texas has four seasons: Drought, Flood, Blizzard and Twister

"Texas has four seasons: Drought, Flood, Blizzard and Twister.” No one knows the origin of this joke, but it possibly comes from California, where “Earthquake” and “Fire” are added for “Blizzard” and “Twister.”

Another joke is: “Texas has four seasons: Almost Summer, Summer, Still Summer, and Christmas.”


Texas Sayings
Texas has four seasons, drought, flood, blizzard and twister.

Texas
Monthly

Texas Sayings by Anne Dingus
Texas has four seasons: drought, flood, blizzard, and twister. That old saying isn’t far from wrong. Because of its sheer size, Texas experiences all kinds of weather—sometimes all at once. Out in West Texas, the weather can be drier than the heart of a haystack and windier than a fifty-pound bag of whistling lips. A duststorm is dubbed “Panhandle rain.” Thunderclouds might bring some real rain—say, a real gully-washer toad-strangler. And, all over the state, it’s hot—darned hot. How hot, you ask? Hotter than a stolen tamale. Hotter than a honeymoon hotel. Hotter than a fur coat in Marfa.

Virtual Tourist: Texas Local Customs
The climate of Texas varies greatly from the hot subhumid in the Rio Grande Valley to the cold semi-arid conditions of the northern part of the Panhandle. Then it can be warm and humid in the east to the arid of the Trans-Pecos. Temperatures vary greatly too, ranging from 49 C (120F) to –31C (-23F). Overall they say Texas has four seasons: drought, flood, blizzard and twister. Each year about 100 tornadoes occur, most frequently in the Red River valley. In West Texas where the weather can be dry and windy, a duststorm is dubbed “Panhandle Rain”. In summer, it just HOT.

Big White Hat
The Four Seasons
Tuesday, November 15th, 2005
An old Texism states Texas has four seasons: Almost Summer, Summer, Still Summer and Christmas. Today marks the end of Still Summer. Tis the season.

Reaching for the Light
At Thursday, June 22, 2006 10:09:00 AM, Thee, Hannah! said…
Oh, yes—and happy solstice to you, too.

I can’t believe it’s only just now summer (officially). Texas has four seasons: Almost Summer, Summer, A Little More Summer, and Christmas (which is discernible by the yard art if not by the weather).

Google Groups: rec.music.bluenote
From:  Bob
Date:  Sat, Jun 23 2001 11:14 am

SE Texas has four seasons too: December, January, February and Summer. 

Google Groups: alt.meditiation.transcendental
From:  willytex
Date:  Sun, Jun 24 2001 6:12 pm
Subject: You know you’re from Texas if…
(...)
18. You know all four seasons: Almost Summer, Summer, Still Summer, and Christmas.

Posted by Barry Popik
Texas (Lone Star State Dictionary) • (0) Comments • Tuesday, December 05, 2006 • Permalink