A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

Recent entries:
“I am rarely more focused on 5 seconds than when I’m waiting to skip an ad on the internet” (6/22)
Entry forthcoming—B.P. (6/22)
“Coffee completes me” (6/22)
“I’m only responsible for what I say, not for what you understand” (6/22)
“Sometimes all you need is a billion dollars” (6/22)
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Entry from December 26, 2011
Taylorite (inhabitant of Taylor)

"Taylorite” is the name of an inhabitant of Taylor, Texas. The name “Taylorite” (the term used in Taylor Daily Press) has been cited in print since at least 1902.


Wikipedia: Taylor, Texas
Taylor is a city in Williamson County, Texas, United States. The population was 13,575 at the 2000 census; it was 15,191 in the 2010 census estimate. Taylor’s largest employers include the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT), Durcon Inc, and the T. Don Hutto Residential Center, an immigration control center, which opened in Taylor in May 2006.

4 July 1902, Galveston (TX) Daily News, pg. 6, col. 4:
Rockdale Reporter: While coming down from Georgetown Monday the Reporter man fell in with a Taylorite, and in course of conversation remarked that Taylor seemed to be in a pretty bad fix with no water.

23 April 1906, Galveston (TX) Daily News, “Williamson People There,” pg. 3, col. 3:
Among the number of Taylorites who were in San Francisco at the time of the earthquake were Col. Wm. Kelleher, Mrs. Annie Kelleher and daughters Annie and Elizabeth, members of one of the weathiest and most aristocratic families of Taylor.

3 November 1907, Galveston (TX) Daily News, pg. 26, col. 3:
Miss Oma Kellum, a student of the Southwestern University in Georgetown, spent Sunday and Monday with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Kellum, in Taylor.

Among the Taylorites who attended the Dallas State Fair last week were: Mr. and Mrs. H. T. Kimbro, Mr. and Mrs. John P. Burns, Mr. and Mrs. Owen Olive, and others.

8 December 1909, San Antonio (TX) Light and Gazette, pg. 1, col. 5:
PARTY OF TAYLORITES
TO SEE WEDDING
A large party of friends and relatives of Roy H. Bland of Taylor, are in the city to be present at his wedding tonight to Miss Leah Pumphrey, daughter of Col. R. B. Pumphrey of this city.

12 May 1996, Austin (TX) American-Statesman, “Widely held belief thatTaylor rejected I-35 a myth” by Jerry Mahoney, pg. E2: 
Many Taylorites blame past city leaders for this reversal of fortunes.

26 June 1999, Austin (TX) American-Statesman, “Taylor in transition” by Christian Davenport, pg. A1: 
They are among a new breed of Taylorites.

18 August 2005, Austin (TX) American-Statesman, “Taylor’s cemetery losing money” by Jennifer Barnes:
Among the rows of markers and monuments are immigrants, longtime Taylorites, Civil War veterans. Majestic monuments sit next to graves marked by two lengths of pipe joined to make a cross.

Taylor (TX) Daily Press
Kathleen Brinkmeyer
Posted: Tuesday, January 11, 2011 1:00 am
Kathleen Brinkmeyer, a lifetime resident of Taylor, Texas, passed away peacefully in her home Friday, Jan. 7, 2011 surrounded by her family.
(...)
She made lifetime friendships and helped teach generations of Taylorites.

Taylor (TX) Daily News
Geraldine Laverne Walker
Posted: Friday, September 30, 2011 1:00 am
Geraldine Laverne Walker, age 94, of Hutto, formerly of Taylor, died Sept. 28, 2011.

She was born May 29, 1917 in Santa Barbara, Calif. to Ora and Clarence Gilstrap and spent her early years in the Comanche, Texas area. On Jan. 28, 1939 she married Lewin Leonard Walker who worked on the railroad and was transferred to Taylor with the Missouri Kansas Texas railroad in 1947.  The same year she opened her own business, Walker’s Kindergarten and Daycare Center, and raised a lot of little Taylorites.

Posted by Barry Popik
Texas (Lone Star State Dictionary) • (0) Comments • Monday, December 26, 2011 • Permalink