A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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Entry from November 21, 2011
“Stay on the ice and pay the price” (hockey adage)

"Stay on the ice and pay the price” is an ice hockey adage. Hockey is a tiring game; players who stay on the ice and refuse to be substituted for ultimately “pay the price.”

“Stay on the ice and pay the price” was given as an “old hockey adage” in the book The Physics of Hockey (2002).


Google Books
The Physics of Hockey
By Alain Haché
Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press
2002
Pg. 60:
As the old hockey adage goes, “stay on the ice and pay the price” — there is not much point in keeping an exhausted star player on the ice if he can be outpaced by a mediocre defenseman.

Deseret News (Salt Lake City, UT)
Hockey burns up energy
Published: Thursday, Jan. 3, 2008 12:06 a.m. MST
By Bill Sones and Rich Sones Ph.D.
“Stay on the ice and pay the price” runs the old hockey adage. Who’s paying what and why?
Answer: For this fast-paced game, exhaustion is often a problem at the uncoached amateur level, as some players hog the ice time even to the point where a good player can be outpaced by a mediocre defenseman, says Alain Hache in “The Physics of Hockey.” Hockey’s energy drain is greater than other team sports like basketball and baseball, with National Hockey League players skating at speeds in excess of 25 mph (40 km/hr). The legendary Bobby Hull, fastest of his time, was once clocked at 29.2 mph (47 km/h) and after he had spent 29 minutes on the ice during one game, sports scientists figured he had skated a total of about 8 miles (13 kms). So it’s not surprising that during 60 minutes of regulation time, a player can burn several hundred calories and lose up to 10 pounds.

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CitySports/Games • (0) Comments • Monday, November 21, 2011 • Permalink