A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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Entry from May 21, 2013
Smoke-vide (smoke + sous-vide)

"Smoke-vide” (smoke + sous-vide) is a seemingly unlikely combination of cooking styles. The award-winning IQUE barbecue team of Andy Husbands—also the chef/owner of Tremont 647 (647 Tremont Street, Boston, MA)—and Christ Hart explained in Wicked Good Barbecue: Fearless Recipes from Two Damn Yankees Who Have Won the Biggest, Baddest BBQ Competition in the World (2012):

“‘SMOKE-VIDE’ BEEF RIBS
WITH BLUES HOG FOAM
In this dish, we marry the down-home American barbecue and high-end sous-vide methods, starting with smoke for flavor and moving on to the vacuum-sealed water bath for 12 to 24 hours. The beauty of sous vide is that after the slow cook is completed, the meat can be held in the bath almost indefinitely. When you are ready to eat, simply pull your dinner out of the water and serve it. Because we are using a fancy method beloved by many high-end chefs, we add a whimsical note with a BBQ sauce foam. It’s not something you see every day, but we love mixing the unexpected with classic barbecue dishes.”


The meat is is first smoked and then is prepared sous-vide. Andy Husbands’ “smoke-vide” was mention in a May 18, 2013 Wall Street Journal article titled “The New Barbecue: Upstart chefs take on America’s most sacred culinary cow.”


Wikipedia: Sous-vide
Sous-vide (pron.: /suːˈviːd/; French for “under vacuum") is a method of cooking food sealed in airtight plastic bags in a water bath for longer than normal cooking times—72 hours in some cases—at an accurately regulated temperature much lower than normally used for cooking, typically around 55 °C (131 °F) to 60 °C (140 °F) for meats and higher for vegetables. The intention is to cook the item evenly, and not to overcook the outside while still keeping the inside at the same “doneness”, keeping the food juicier.

Google Books
Wicked Good Barbecue:
Fearless Recipes from Two Damn Yankees Who Have Won the Biggest, Baddest BBQ Competition in the World

By Andy Husbands and Chris Hart, with Andrea Pyenson
Beverly, MA: Fair WInds Press
2012
Pg. 137:
“SMOKE-VIDE” BEEF RIBS
WITH BLUES HOG FOAM
In this dish, we marry the down-home American barbecue and high-end sous-vide methods, starting with smoke for flavor and moving on to the vacuum-sealed water bath for 12 to 24 hours. The beauty of sous vide is that after the slow cook is completed, the meat can be held in the bath almost indefinitely. When you are ready to eat, simply pull your dinner out of the water and serve it. Because we are using a fancy method beloved by many high-end chefs, we add a whimsical note with a BBQ sauce foam. It’s not something you see every day, but we love mixing the unexpected with classic barbecue dishes.

Twitter
Joshua Tsui
‏@JoshYTsui 30 Jun
@Tamssot I wonder if I can mimic your BBQ without BBQ. Sous vide with smoking gun or smoke salt, then seared on gas grill.
12:44 AM - 30 Jun 12

Moshe Tamssot‏
@Tamssot
@robojoshy Smoke Vide smile
12:44 AM - 30 Jun 12

CityWeekly (Salt Lake City, UT)
12-13-2012 - Page 28
Cookbooks for Christmas by Ted Scheffler
(...)
The recipe for “sous-vide” beef ribs with Blues Hog foam alone is worth the price of admission to this celebration of barbecue.

The Wall Street Journal
Updated May 18, 2013, 1:03 p.m. ET
The New Barbecue
Upstart chefs take on America’s most sacred culinary cow

By JOSH OZERSKY
(...)
Up in Boston, Andy Husbands dominates the world of competition barbecue with straight-up ribs and pork butt. And then at his restaurant, Tremont 647, he turns around and serves tasting menus of dishes like “smoke-vide” beef ribs—a preparation that combines smoking with the sous-vide method of cooking vacuum-sealed food in a low-temperature water bath—and smoked duck-confit po’boys.

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityFood/Drink • Tuesday, May 21, 2013 • Permalink