A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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“A day without wine isn’t over yet” (5/29)
“I’m assuming Greek yogurt is just regular yogurt but with way more hair” (5/29)
Entry forthcoming—B.P. (5/29)
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Entry from July 23, 2009
Skyscraper Sandwich

Entry in progress—B.P.

The long list of the names of sandwiches served on long rolls includes blimpie, bomber, Cuban (medianoche), Dagwood, garibaldi, gondola, grinder, hero, hoagie, Italian, jawbreaker, muffuletta, peacemaker (La Mediatrice), pilgrim, pistolette, po’ boy (poor boy), rocket, spiedie, spucky (spuckie, spukie), submarine (sub), torpedo, torta (Mexican po’ boy), wedge and zeppelin (zep).


6 March 1925, Dallas (TX) News, “REG’LAR FELLERS BY GENE BYRNES” (comic strip), part 2, pg. 16:
Skyscraper Sandwiches
(...)
BOY1: I WOULD BE SATISFIED WITH THE GREASY VEST RESTAURANT! AN’ ALL I WOULD EAT IS SANDWIDGES!
BOY2: MY MOTHER CAN BEAT THEM MAKIN’ SANDWIDGES!
BOY1: YOUR MOTHER ONEY MAKES ‘EM ONE STORY HIGH BUT IN THE GREASY VEST WINDOW THEY HAVE ‘EM WITH FOUR STORIES TO ‘EM!

14 July 1928, Galveston (TX) Daily News, pg. 11, col. 1:
Skyscraper Sandwiches—Trim the crust from a loaf of bread and cut the bread across from end to end in long slices about one-quarter inche thick. Spread the slices with softened butter, then begin to arrange the “skyscrapers.” On the first long slice of bread arrange slices of cold boiled ham. On the next slice place Switzerland cheese cut very thin; dot this here and there with mustard. Coer the third bread slice with slices tomatoes, brushed with mayonnaise. Swiss cheese dotted with chili sauce of catsup is arranged over the next slice, lettuce covered lightly with mayonnaise over the fifth, and ham is used for the sixth. Then the last slice of bread is placed on the pile, buttered side down, and the loaf is wrapped in a napkin and pressed fifteen minutes. Then it is cut in sections of any desired shaoe and size, or carried intact to the picnic to be sliced at serving.

17 March 1929, Los Angeles (CA) Times, “Waffles for World Weal” by Alfred P. Perry, pg. B1:
SKYSCRAPER SANDWICHES. Then there are those magnificent sandwiches—chicken, lobster, ...

14 February 1937, New York (NY) Times, “Out of the Editor’s Mailbag,” pg. 69:
SANDWICHES: And Odes
I appreciate the excellence of Fairfax Downey’s humorous verse in THE TIMES. I don’t know who invented the skyscraper sandwich or why, but the description of it here is eloquent as well as accurate. It is, if I may be pardoned the pun, a mess. And in a drug store sometimes there aretables in among the bookstalls and umbrella racks, but there are no chairs at the fountain. And only recently has provision been made for the accommodation of human knees. Has there ever been an Ode to a Skyscraper? Or an epic poem recounting the heroic struggles of an unhappy motorist trying to avoid a summons? These things have an important place in modern civilized life and are deserving of glorification in verse, as is the drug store luncheon.—R. C. O’BRIEN, New York.

8 April 1937, Dunkirk (NY) Evening Observer, pg. 6, col. 5:
IN NEW YORK
The Skyscraper Sandwich
It Really Owes Its Development to Arnold Reu-
ben and His Celebrated Costumes.

By GEORGE ROSS

17 July 1937, Lima (OH) News, pg. 5, col. 3 ad:
STONE’S SKYSCRAPER SANDWICHES
12 DELICIOUS VARIETIES
5c
STONE’S GRILL

1 January 1940, Atchison (KS) Daily Globe, pg. 15, col. 1 ad:
SNAPP’S
Skyscraper Sandwich Shop

22 March 1945, Cleveland (OH) Plain Dealer, pg. 14 comic strip ad:
BOY1: I HEARD ABOUT TIP-TOP BREAD ON DICK TRACY’S PROGRAM.
BOY2: THAT’S RIGHT, TIP-TOP HELPS KEEP YOU STRONG AND FULL OF PEP—LIKE DICK TRACY. SAY—LET’S MAKE A SKYSCRAPER SANDWICH!
BOY1: WHAT’S A SKYSCRAPER SANDWICH?
BOY2: TRIPLE-DECKER TIP-TOP WITH JELLY AND PEANUT BUTTER. BOY, IT’S TOPS!

4 April 1948, Kingsport (TN) Times-News, pg. 13B, col. 5:
BLONDIE’S COOK BOOK, edited by Chic Young, 141 pages. David McKay Company.
Dagwood Bumstead’s skyscraper sandwich is one of the staples, not only of the Bumstead ktichen, and the American cartoon, but of daily conversation over newspapers.

24 July 1953, San Antonio (TX) Light, pg. 25, col. 3:
From that modest beginning sandwiches have come a long way. Today, they run the gamut from a snack, to the most elaborate canape to a meal-in-one or a skyscraper sandwich.

5 September 1962, Long Beach (CA) Press-Telegram, “Did You Know?” by Mildred K. Flanary, pg. B4, col. 7:
Did you know that from skyscraper sandwiches to single-layer open-face treats nothing beats California Turkey!

30 April 1968, Oakland (CA) Tribune, pg. 42, col. 4 ad:
HOOK ‘N LADDER
RESTAURANT & COCKTAIL LOUNGE
FEATURING
SKYSCRAPER SANDWICHES

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityFood/Drink • Thursday, July 23, 2009 • Permalink