A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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Entry from October 08, 2013
Rich Boy (sandwich)

New Orleans, Louisiana, is known for its “poor boy” ("po’ boy") sandwich. However, at about the same time as the birth of the “po’ boy,” Martin J. Cull delicatessen, located in New Orleans at 3201-03 Magazine Street, served “rich boy” sandwiches.

The 1930s “rich boy” name is of historical interest today. The “rich boy” name is infrequently used today, usually to describe a sandwich rich in ingredients.


22 August 1931, The Times-Picayune (New Orleans, LA), pg. 18, col. 4 ad:
Poppy seed bread, 5c. Also Rich Boy sandwiches, 2 for 5c.
MARTIN J. CULL
3201-03 MAGAZINE STREET

26 September 1931, The Times-Picayune (New Orleans, LA), pg. 18, col. 4 ad:
DELICATESSEN
2 rich boy sandwiches 5c, and a glass of milk equals dinner for a dime.
(...)
MARTIN J. CULL
3201-03 MAGAZINE STREET

10 October 1931, The Times-Picayune (New Orleans, LA), pg. 20, col. 3 ad:
DELICATESSEN
(...)
Rich boy sandwiches do not make your hands or clothes dirty. For a nickel you get one for “him” and one for you.
(...)
MARTIN J. CULL
3201-03 MAGAZINE STREET

24 October 1931, The Times-Picayune (New Orleans, LA), pg. 23, col. 3 ad:
DELICATESSEN
A poor boy won’t starve if he eats 2 rich boy sandwiches for 5c.
(...)
MARTIN J. CULL
3201-03 MAGAZINE STREET

21 January 1933, The Times-Picayune (New Orleans, LA), pg. 16, col. 5 ad:
You can eat a sandwich in any kind of “languidge.” “3 rich boys 5c.”
MARTIN J. CULL
3201-03 MAGAZINE STREET

The Wall Street Journal
FOOD & DRINK March 5, 2011
The Crescent City’s Greatest Po’boys
Seventy-two hours of gravy-faced, napkin-thrashing, French bread-crunching taste-testing of New Orleans’ most beloved sandwich

By STEVE GARBARINO
(...)
The po’boy was named in 1929 by brothers Bennie and Clovis Martin, New Orleans bakers and former trolley conductors who fed drivers immersed in a historic streetcar strike free sandwiches filled with scraps. (These days, 6- to 8-inch-long “shorties” cost from $5 to $11, depending on fillings.) As a new worker approached the food line outside their French Market bakery and restaurant, the brothers, according to authenticated family letters, would shout to each other, “Here comes another poor boy.”
(...)
“It’s a ‘rich-boy,’ not a po’boy,” concedes Tenney Flynn, chef of the French Quarter seafood restaurant GW Fins, whose fried-Maine-lobster po’boy took “Best of Show” at last November’s festival.

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityFood/Drink • Tuesday, October 08, 2013 • Permalink