A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

Recent entries:
“A friend of wine is a friend of mine” (4/25)
“The first thing on my bucket list is to fill the bucket with wine” (4/24)
“I’m a wine enthusiast. The more wine I drink, the more enthusiastic I become” (4/24)
“Homemade with love. In other words, I licked the spoon and kept using it” (4/24)
“Uncork and unwind” (wine saying) (4/24)
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Entry from June 26, 2011
Pretzel Rod

Pretzel rods look like cigars and don’t have the familiar “twist” pretzel shape. The term “pretzel rods” has been cited in print since at least 1958. The Bachman Company (of Reading, Pennsylvania) originated or popularized the pretzel rod with its “Rolled Rods” product.

Chocolate-dipped pretzel rods have been made since at least 1990.


Bachman
The Bachman Company is family owned and operated with a long tradition of product excellence. Headquartered in Reading, Pennsylvania, with manufacturing facilities in both Berks and Lancaster County, we’ve been committed to making quality pretzels and snacks for 125 years. Our signature Rolled Rods and Twist Pretzels are made the old-fashioned way, not extruded but actually rolled or twisted by our heritage bakery machines, then Brick Oven Flame-Baked, ensuring a distinctive crispy bite.

Our founder, J.S. Bachman, went into business in 1884 with just one product – pretzels. He had a small oven and a horse-drawn delivery cart, and his product was hand-made and packed. Although the pretzel had been known in Europe for nearly 13 centuries by 1884, Bachman’s bakery was one of the first in America. Since then, The Bachman Company has become a leading producer of a full line of salty snacks, including Twist Pretzels, Rolled Rods, Pretzel Stix, Pita Pretzel Squares, Kidzels, Jax Cheese Curls, and 100% Stone-Ground Tortilla Chips.

Old Dutch
Our Pretzel Rods are a tasty lowfat snack favorite that we’re sure you’ll love. We’ve made this flavor with healthy eating in mind and a taste that can’t be beat. A special favorite throughout the Upper Midwest, bring them along on your next canoe or fishing trip in the summer or snowshoeing or skiing trip in the winter.

taquitos.net
Utz Pretzel Rods
Taste: Pretty good standard-tasting pretzel rod, much like Bachman pretzel rods. The best way to eat this, of course, is to suck on it like a cigar. Licking off all the salt first, too, is another fun thing to do with a pretzel rod.

Google News Archive
11 November 1958, Meriden (CT) Journal, “Pretzel Has Not Changed In Size For Centuries,” pg. 24, col. 4:
Although the one and original pretzel has not changed, it has a number of attractive sisters and brothers in various shapes and sizes..."Dutch" pretzels, cocktail sticks, pretzel rods, pretzel nuggets and so on. They all ahve the crisp and crunchy texture and salty tang of the pretzel original.

17 December 1959, Troy (NY) Record, pg. 39 ad:
BACHMAN
PRETZEL RODS
19c
(Central Markets—ed.)

25 May 1964, New York (NY) Times, pg. 41 ad:
Pretzel Rods Bachman cello pkg. 33c
(Waldbaum’s supermarket—ed.)

13 December 1990, CHicago (IL) Sun-Times, “Wrap up gift ideas with homemade nibbles” by Lynn Baer:
Clay pots for chocolate-dipped pretzel rods

Our Best Bites
Dipped Pretzel Rods
12.10.2008
One of my favorite things to decorate and give away at the holidays is dipped pretzel rods. They’re easy, relatively inexpensive, and universally loved by kids and adults alike. One of the greatest things is that you can customize them according to tastes and holidays–in October, I made dark chocolate/white chocolate magic wands dipped in colored sprinkles. For this go-around, I was inspired by everyone’s caramel apple suggestions and REALLY wanted to do caramel, white chocolate, and cinnamon sugar for the pretzels.

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityFood/Drink • (0) Comments • Sunday, June 26, 2011 • Permalink