A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

Recent entries:
“A brownie is like an espresso of cake” (7/28)
“Stress is when you wake up screaming and you realize you haven’t fallen asleep yet” (7/27)
“Everything we eat is processed sunshine” (7/27)
“We eat pizza from the inside out” (7/27)
“You’re too blessed to be stressed” (7/27)
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Entry from March 06, 2006
Patrolio (NY Fire Patrol)
"Patrolio" is a person in the New York Fire Patrol. The Fire Patrol dates to the early 1800s, but discussions were held in 2006 to disband the organization.

http://www.fpny123.net/history.html
The Fire Patrol can trace its beginnings back to 1803, when the Mutual Assistance and Bag Corporation was formed by a group of volunteers to protect and preserve the contents of buildings from fire and water damage.
(...)
Operated by the New York Board of Fire Underwriters, the New York Fire Patrol was organized in 1839 to patrol lower Manhattan. Their job was twofold: to discover fires and to prevent losses to insured properties. The New York Fire Patrol evolved, and in 1867, a state charter was granted to legally extinguish fires and conduct salvage operations throughout New York City. The New York Fire Patrol is the oldest paid fire service in the United States, and it also remains the last insurance-funded fire salvage corps in the country. Today, the fire patrol continues to serve the city of New York, responding to over 10,000 alarms each year alongside the Fire Department of New York.

Operated by the New York Board of Fire Underwriters, the New York Fire Patrol was organized in 1839 to patrol lower Manhattan. Their job was twofold: to discover fires and to prevent losses to insured properties. The New York Fire Patrol evolved, and in 1867, a state charter was granted to legally extinguish fires and conduct salvage operations throughout New York City. The New York Fire Patrol is the oldest paid fire service in the United States, and it also remains the last insurance-funded fire salvage corps in the country. Today, the fire patrol continues to serve the city of New York, responding to over 10,000 alarms each year alongside the Fire Department of New York.

http://www.fpny123.net/media.html
The End Of The Fire Patrol? - The Gothamist - Online Publication - March 24, 2006

After 200 Years, the Fire Patrol's Time May Be Up - New York Times - March 24, 2006

Rebuttal to NY Daily News Article - March 19, 2006

Statement from International Association of Fire Fighters - February 6, 2006

STORIED FIRE PATROL FACES THE AX - New York Post - February 5, 2006

New York Fire Patrol might be disbanded - Staten Island Advance - February 3, 2006

Another Romantic Tradition...outta here - Firehouse.com - February 1, 2006

NYFP Blog - February 1, 2006

(Google News)
After 200 Years, the Fire Patrol's Time May Be Up
New York Times, United States - Mar 23, 2006
... However, this may be the last year that the "Patrolios," as the units refer to themselves, roam the streets of New York in their distinctive red helmets. ...

http://words.grubbykid.com/2006/03/24/fire_patrol_no_more.html
As reported by the NY Times (and linked by Gothamist), the New York Fire Patrol - which I previously wrote about might be no more:

While the Fire Department puts out fires, the patrol works in its wake, salvaging property and limiting the damage at commercial blazes. The patrolmen — no women are now on the force — do not bring hoses. They bring pumps for getting rid of the water. They do not break windows to vent heat. They bring protective canvas tarps to throw atop computers or retail goods.

However, this may be the last year that the "Patrolios," as the units refer to themselves, roam the streets of New York in their distinctive red helmets.

The insurance industry has decided that the old way of doing things may not be the best way, that the property salvaged by the 98-member force is not worth its $8.5 million budget, which is financed by an annual assessment on fire insurers.

It would be a shame if this quirky New York institution would slip away into history - like so much of New York City.

24 April 1974, Chicago Tribune, "Cops' horsy set seeks steed names," pg. 3:
And then there were the names for rank -- everything from Patrolio, Copper, Sergeant, Major, and Chief.
Posted by Barry Popik
Workers/People • (0) Comments • Monday, March 06, 2006 • Permalink