A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

Recent entries:
“Why can’t someone look at me the same way I look at pizza?” (4/27)
“What’s the best place to buy Cheerios and donuts?"/"Hole Foods.” (4/26)
“Warning! The consumption of alcohol might cause you to think you can sing” (4/26)
“Life is basically all the stuff you have to do to get from coffee to wine time” (4/25)
“I respect faith, but doubt is what gets you an education” (4/25)
More new entries...

A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z


Entry from September 18, 2004
Orient Express, or International Line (7 train)
The "Orient Express" is the 7 train that takes you to the many Asian neighborhoods of Queens. "International Line" is the "politically correct" term.

The real "Express d'Orient" began in 1883, taking passengers from Paris to Vama on the Black Sea, and from there to Istanbul. Agatha Christie (1890-1976) popularized that train with her murder mystery, Murder in the Calais Coach (1960), or Murder on the Orient Express. The book later became the basis for the popular movie Murder on the Orient Express (1974)

New York's "Orient Express" is relatively murder-free, fortunately.

19 August 1985, New York Times, pg. 28:
Many of them (Asian immigrants--ed.) have followed the path of the No. 7 line - dubbed "the Orient Express" by many - into northern Queens, most often to Flushing.

14 September 1986, New York Times, pg. R7:
"The IRT No. 7 train to Flushing is being called the 'Orient Express,'" he (John Wang, vice president of the Chinatown Planning Council--ed.) said, "because so many Asians are riding it to satellite Chinatowns in Newtown Creek, Elmhurst and particularly Flushing."

20 November 1988, New York Times, pg. SMA26:
NO. 7 LINE - THE ORIENT EXPRESS.
Posted by Barry Popik
Transportation • (0) Comments • Saturday, September 18, 2004 • Permalink