A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

Recent entries:
“Tuesday is just Monday’s ugly sister” (3/27)
“Happiness is having a rare steak, a bottle of whisky—and a dog to eat the rare steak” (3/27)
“What whiskey will not cure, there is no cure for” (3/27)
“Good girls are made of sugar and spice. Country girls are made of whiskey on ice” (3/27)
“This whiskey tastes like I’m about to tell you how I really feel” (3/27)
More new entries...

A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z


Entry from August 15, 2008
“Oh, we must be in Pasadena!”

The city of Pasadena (near Houston) has many petrochemical plants and has been nicknamed “Stinkadena” by many people. According to an internet joke list about Houston (that dates to at least 2003), when Houston drivers approach an area that smells, the driver or the passengers says: “Oh, we must be in Pasadena!”


Wikipedia: Pasadena, Texas
Pasadena is a city southeast of Houston in Harris County, Texas within the Houston–Sugar Land–Baytown metropolitan area. It is the second largest city in the county, 15th largest in the state and 159th largest in the United States, next to its namesake city, Pasadena, California, the 160th largest. The area was founded in 1893 by John H. Burnett of Galveston. At the time of its founding, the land’s lush, flowering vegetation inspired Burnett to name the city after Pasadena, California.

As of the 2000 U.S. Census, the city’s population was 141,674. It boasts the largest all volunteer municipal fire department in the United States, the Pasadena Volunteer Fire Department. The city’s economy is closely linked to the nearby Houston Ship Channel and its related industrial districts, as well as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center in the bordering Clear Lake area. 
(...)
Culture
The city has several museums, including the Pasadena Historical Museum, the Bay Area Museum and Armand Bayou Nature Center. Pasadena also has a community theater (Pasadena Little Theatre), a large rodeo each year (Pasadena Livestock Show & Rodeo) and orchestra (the Pasadena Philharmonic). The city’s newspaper is the Pasadena Citizen.

Because of its location near the enormous amount of refineries that dot the ship channel (which help to make Houston’s petrochemical complex the largest in the nation), Pasadena has been dubbed by locals with the nickname “Stinkadena.” Another reason for the name may be the large sewage treatment plant located along State Highway 225 that links Houston to Pasadena. Another nickname, “Pasa-get-down-dena”, was coined in the mid-1980s by a Houston morning radio DJ named Moby on his show Moby in the Morning on the long gone station, 97 Rock. At least two country music songs have been recorded with “Pasa-get-down-dena” as the title: one by Kenefick on their album “Hard Road,” and John Evans on his album “Biggest Fool in Town.”

Google Groups: houston.general
Newsgroups: houston.general
From: George Kerby
Date: 13 Nov 2003 14:54:45 GMT
Local: Thurs, Nov 13 2003 10:54 am
Subject: Traffic Considerations for the Super Bowl in Houston

1. You must learn to pronounce the city name. It is “Ewe-stun” not “Hue-stun.” Oh, and it is pronounced “San Phal-ee-pay” not “San Phil-eep” (San Felipe).
2. Forget the traffic rules you learned elsewhere. Houston has its own version of traffic rules ... Hold on and pray! There is no such thing as a dangerous high-speed chase in Houston. We all drive like that.
3. All directions start with, “Go down to Loop 610 ...” which has no beginning and no end.
4. The Chamber of Commerce calls getting through traffic a “scenic drive.”
5. The morning rush hour is from 6:00 A.M. to 10:00 A.M. The evening rush hour is from 3:00 P.M. to 7:00 P.M. Friday’s rush hour starts Thursday morning.
6. If you actually stop at a yellow light, you will be rear-ended, cussed out, and possibly shot. When you are the first one off the starting line, count to five when the light turns green before going, to avoid getting into any cross traffic’s way.
7. Kuykendahl Road can ONLY be pronounced by a native Houstonian.
8. Construction on I-10, I-45, US 59 and Loop 610 is a way of life and a permanent form of entertainment.
9. All unexplained smells are explained by the phrase, “Oh, we must be in Pasadena !”

Google Groups: soc.subculture. bondage-bdsm
Newsgroups: soc.subculture.bondage-bdsm
From: “Seth J. Fogarty”
Date: Thu, 20 May 2004 14:13:22 +0000 (UTC)
Local: Thurs, May 20 2004 10:13 am
Subject: Re: Well, Texas.

> 9. All unexplained sights and smells are accounted for by the phrase,
> “Oh, we must be in Pasadena!”

Oh, we must be in.. Chicago

TransGriot
Friday, January 19, 2007
The Houston Traffic Rules
This was posted to another group that I’m a member of and I found it hilarious. The original author is unknown. I’ve cleaned it up and added some things as well.

H-Town, Space City, the Bayou City, 3rd Coast, The Dirty 3rd or whatever you wanna call it.

1. You must learn to pronounce the city name. It is ‘Hue-stun,’ not ‘Ewe-stun’, or ‘house-tun’ You call it ‘house-ton’ and we know you’re a Yankee or worse, from New York.
2. Forget the traffic rules you learned elsewhere. Houston has its own version. The first one is hold on and pray. There is no such thing as a dangerous high-speed chase in Houston. We all drive like that.
3. All directions start with, “Go down to Loop 610”...which has no beginning and no end. Conversely, if you get lost, find Loop 610. 30 minutes later you’ll end up in the part of town you wanted to be in or find the major street you were looking for.
4. The Chamber of Commerce calls getting through traffic..."a scenic drive.”
5. The morning rush hour is from 6:00AM to 10:00AM. The evening rush hour is from 3:00PM to 7:00PM. Friday’s rush hour starts Thursday morning.
6. If you actually stop at a yellow light, you will be rear-ended, cussed out and possibly shot. If you find yourself as the first car off the line, count to five when the light turns green before proceeding in order to avoid getting clobbered by someone running the red light on the other side.
7. Kuykendahl Road can ONLY be pronounced by a native Houstonian.
8. Construction on I-10, I-45, US 59 and Loop 610 is a generational way of life, an economic stimulant and a permanent form of entertainment.
9. All unexplained smells are explained by the phrases, “Oh, we must be in Pasadena!” , “God, I hate Baytown!” or “I must be near the Ship Channel.”

Playa.info
Doggiemom
04-07-2008
(FUNNY) Rules of Houston...Texas
For those of you that live in the Houston area....and for those of you thinking of moving here!

Rules of Houston , H-Town, 3rd Coast, Bayou City , The Dirty 3rd, or whatever you wanna call it.

1. You must learn to pronounce the city name. It is “Hue-stun,” not “Ewe-stun”, or “house-tun” Oh yea, the street is pronounced “San Phil-ee-pay,” not” San Phil-eep” (San Felipe). Enunciate, you idiots!
2. Forget the traffic rules you learned elsewhere. Houston has its own version of traffic rules...Hold on and pray. There is no such thing as a dangerous high-speed chase in Houston . We all drive like that.
3. All directions start with, “Go down to Loop 610”.... which has no beginning and no end.
4. The Chamber of Commerce calls getting through traffic… a “ Scenic Drive ..”
5. The morning rush hour is from 6:00AM to 10:00AM . The evening rush hour is from 3:00PM to 7:00PM . Friday’s rush hour starts Thursday morning.
6. If you actually stop at a yellow light, you will be rear-ended, cussed out and possibly shot. When you are the first one off the starting line, count to five when the light turns green before going, to avoid getting into any cross-traffic’s way.
7. Kuykendahl Road can ONLY be pronounced by a native Houstonian.( kirk-en-doll)
8. Construction on I-10, I-45, US 59 and Loop 610 is a way of life and a permanent form of entertainment.
9. All unexplained smells are explained by the phrases, “Oh, we must be in Pasadena !” or “God, I hate Baytown !” or “Mmm, smell that Texas City !”

Posted by Barry Popik
Texas (Lone Star State Dictionary) • (0) Comments • Friday, August 15, 2008 • Permalink