A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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Entry forthcoming—B.P. (10/17)
“How do you stop a dog from barking in the back yard?"/"Put it in the front yard.” (10/17)
“What do you call a nightmare about paper?"/"A bad ream.” (10/17)
“I’ve been cutting carbs lately—with a pizza cutter” (10/17)
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Entry from March 14, 2016
Noisyville-on-the-Subway

American writer O. Henry (the pen name of William Sydney Porter, 1862-1910) wrote in the short story “The Duel: A Story of New York” (1906):

“What’s that? Oh, you’ve still got your hammer out for New York, have you? Well, little old Noisyville-on-the-Subway is good enough for me. It’s giving me mine.”

“Noisyville-on-the-Subway” was used by O. Henry only once and is of historical interest today.


Wikipedia: O. Henry
William Sydney Porter (September 11, 1862 – June 5, 1910), known by his pen name O. Henry, was an American short story writer. O. Henry’s short stories are known for their wit, wordplay, warm characterization, and surprise endings.

7 January 1906, Detroit (MI) Free Press, “The Duel: A Story of New York” by O. Henry, Sunday Magazine, pg. 2, col. 2:
“What’s that? Oh, you’ve still got your hammer out for New York, have you? Well, little old Noisyville-on-the-Subway is good enough for me. It’s giving me mine.”

Google Books
Strictly Business:
More Stories of the Four Million

By O. Henry
New York, NY: Doubleday, Page & Company
1910
Pg. 297:
“What’s that? Oh, you’ve still got your hammer out for New York, have you? Well, little old Noisyville-on-the-Subway is good enough for me. It’s giving me mine. And, say, I used to think the West was the whole round world—only slightly flattened at the poles whenever Bryan ran.”

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityNicknames/Slogans • Monday, March 14, 2016 • Permalink