A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

Recent entries:
“An ego and a superego walk into a bar…” (bar joke) (2/22)
“Head of lettuce. That must be a boring job” (2/22)
Entry forthcoming—B.P. (2/22)
Entry forthcoming—B.P. (2/22)
“What do you call a priest who becomes a lawyer?"/"A father in law.” (2/22)
More new entries...

A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z


Entry from August 22, 2015
No-No (no-hit, no-run game in baseball)

A baseball “no-no” is a “no hit, no run” game—a “no-hitter.” A “no-no” can also be a “perfect game” (no hits, no runs and no errors).

“Bob Feller pitched a no-no-game and on his second trip was shelled plenty” was cited in print in 1940.


Wikipedia: No-hitter
In baseball, a no-hitter (also known as a no-hit game and colloquially as a no-no) is a game in which a team was not able to record a single hit. Major League Baseball (MLB) officially defines a no-hitter as a completed game in which a team that batted in at least nine innings recorded no hits. A pitcher who prevents the opposing team from achieving a hit is said to have “thrown a no-hitter”. This is a rare accomplishment for a pitcher or pitching staff: only 292 have been thrown in Major League Baseball history since 1876, an average of about two per year. In most cases in MLB, no-hitters are recorded by a single pitcher who throws a complete game; one thrown by two or more pitchers is a combined no-hitter.

26 April 1940, The Oregonian (Portland, OR), :The Second Guess” by Billy Stepp, pg. 26, col. 1:
Bob Feller pitched a no-no-game and on his second trip was shelled plenty.

14 April 1942, Idaho Daily Statesman (Boise, ID), “Pilot Roster Complete For Training,” pg. 9, col. 4:
Veteran Gerald Staley took over in the fifth and pitch a no-no until the final ninth inning when the semi-pros managed their two runs.

1 May 1948, Tri-City Herald (Pasco, WA), “Grizzlies, Blue Devils Bombed Into Submission,” pg. 8, col. 4:
He allowed one run on two hits and three errors. Up until the seventh, he had himself a no-no game.

27 June 1950, The Daily Olympian (Olympia, WA), pg. 2, col. 7:
Seattle Boy Hurls No-No Contest
As Staters Split In Annual Tilt


31 May 1951, The Oregonian (Portland, OR), “That’s Baseball,” pg. 20, col. 2:
That was in the eighth, and no doubt spectators and radio listeners by the thousand were pulling for ano-no achievement for the Cleveland pitcher.

26 April 1952, The Oregonian (Portland, OR), pg. 6, col. 2:
No-No Anti-Climax
Elmer Singleton’s feat of pitching 12 inning of no-hit, no-run baseball for San Francisco against Sacramento will not go down in the record books as a no-hitter becausehe tired in the 13th and gave up three singles to lose, 1 to 0.

But, of the more than 125 no-no games pitched in the major leagues, the records show none with a stringof hitless innings to match that of SIngleton’s Pacific Coast league performance.

7 July 1954, Seattle (WA) Times, pg. 34, col. 8:
Kaneko Hurls No-No, Hits 14th Homer

16 April 1958, The Oregonian (Portland, OR), “Prep Patter” by Ferd Borsch, sec. 2, pg. 3, col. 1:
Bill Booth and Dave Wells, the only seniors on The Dalles staff, kept Baker hitless on both ends of a twin bill opener last Friday. Booth, a righthander, fashioned a no-no and struck out 14 for a 4-0 win in the opener. Then southpaw Wells came back in the nightcap with another no-hitter as the Indians prevailed, 9-1.

1 June 1964, The Oregonian (Portland, OR), “Greg’s Gossip” by L. H. Gregory, sec. 3, pg. 1, col. 1:
Summary—One no-no, one 1-hitter, one 2-hitter, one 3-hitter, one 4-hitter, two 5-hitter, one 6-hitter in games won, plus opening 8-hitter in five innings at Arkansas that counted neither way for him (Sam McDowell-- ed.).

23 July 1970, Lexington (KY) Herald, “Gomez After Win So He Lifts Kirby During No-Hitter” by Dan Berger (AP), pg. 21, col. 1:
CLAY KIRBY
Pitches A No-No

OCLC WorldCat record
No no : a dockumentary
Author: Jeffery J Radice; The Orchard,; Baseball Iconoclasts,
Publisher: [Austin, TX] :bBaseball Iconoclasts Production, [2015] ©2015.
Edition/Format: DVD video : English
Database: WorldCat
Summary:
On June 12, 1970, Dock Ellis threw a no-hitter for the Pittsburgh Pirates. In over 137 years of organized professional baseball, it’s the only no-hitter tossed while the pitcher was high on LSD. Dock was often embroiled in controversy on and off the field. Coming up in the ‘60s, while professional baseball hadn’t fully embraced racial equality, he was an outspoken leader who lived the expression “black is beautiful”!

Twitter
Houston Astros
‏@astros
This is how we celebrate a no-no at #MMP! #Astros
11:45 PM - 21 Aug 2015

Rotoworld
Daily Dose: Fiers Fires No-No
By Nathan Grimm
Saturday, August 22, 2015
The Astros managed just one hit in a loss to the Rays on Thursday.

On Friday, Mike Fiers did them one better.

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CitySports/Games • Saturday, August 22, 2015 • Permalink