A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

Recent entries:
“Build a man a fire and he’ll be warm for a night…” (joke) (3/23)
“Why are women and children evacuated first?” (joke) (3/23)
“I’ll have a rum and coke” (joke) (3/23)
“I’ve had so much coffee today I can see noises” (3/23)
“The most dangerous drinking game is seeing how long I can go without coffee” (3/23)
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Entry from July 27, 2010
Newocracy (Newocrat)

Baruch College global business professor Edward Goldberg wrote the The Globalist of March 2010 about “the ‘Newocracy,’ the United States’ new aristocracy who are the true beneficiaries of globalization.” New York (NY) Times columnist Thomas Friedman used the terms “Newocracy” and “Newocrats” in an April 2010 column.

Boston University’s Angelo M. Codevilla disagreed about Edward Goldberg’s “Newocracy,” writing July-August 2010 American Spectator that “our ruling class grew and set itself apart from the rest of us by its connection with ever bigger government, and above all by a certain attitude.”

‘Newocracy” and “Newocrat” have had limited usage in the first half of 2010.


The Globalist
Ending Gridlock in the U.S. Senate
By Edward Goldberg | Friday, March 26, 2010
(...)
And the “Newocracy,” the United States’ new aristocracy who are the true beneficiaries of globalization — including the multinational manager, the technologist and the aspirational members of the meritocracy — have begun to find a home within the Democratic coalition despite historically having aligned themselves with the Republicans.

New York (NY) Times
Who’s Up for Building Bridges?
By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN
Published: April 6, 2010
(...)
“Health care was the final act of the New Deal,” argues Edward Goldberg, who teaches global business at Baruch College and is writing a book on globalization and U.S. politics.
(...)
Globalization has also weakened the Democrats’ blue-collar/union base, but the Democrats have absorbed a new constituency created by globalization — what Goldberg calls the “ ‘Newocracy’ — which combines the multinational corporate manager, the technology entrepreneur and engineer, and the aspirational members of the meritocracy.”

These “Newocrats” previously would have leaned Republican, but now many lean toward Obama. They don’t agree with everything he’s proposing, but they sense that he is working on that bridge to the 21st century, while today’s G.O.P./Tea Party is just not in the game. Today, we have no real opposition party with its own pathway to the 21st century. We just have opposition.

The American Spectator
America’s Ruling Class—And the Perils of Revolution
By Angelo M. Codevilla from the July 2010 - August 2010 issue
(...)
The most widespread answers—by such as the Times‘s Thomas Friedman and David Brooks—are schlock sociology. Supposedly, modern society became so complex and productive, the technical skills to run it so rare, that it called forth a new class of highly educated officials and cooperators in an ever less private sector. Similarly fanciful is Edward Goldberg’s notion that America is now ruled by a “newocracy”: a “new aristocracy who are the true beneficiaries of globalization—including the multinational manager, the technologist and the aspirational members of the meritocracy.” In fact, our ruling class grew and set itself apart from the rest of us by its connection with ever bigger government, and above all by a certain attitude. 

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityGovernment/Law/Politics/Military • (0) Comments • Tuesday, July 27, 2010 • Permalink