A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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“Too much Monday, not enough coffee” (3/25)
“Christ Offers Forgiveness For Everyone Everywhere” ("coffee” backronym) (3/25)
“To make me happy: Make me coffee, bring me coffee, be coffee….coffee” (3/24)
“Coffee! Coffee! It’s our drink! If we don’t get it, we can’t think!” (3/24)
“Coffee: because hating your job should be done with enthusiasm” (3/24)
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Entry from July 24, 2004
New York System (Providence, RI “hot dogs")
"New York System" is the name for a kind of hot dog sold in Providence, Rhode Island.



PROVIDENCE (RI) CITY DIRECTORY 1931

Pg. 575, col. 2:
Coney Island Hot Weiners (Theodore Kanelos) lunch 762 Westminster
Coney Island Special (Aristides Pantelakas) restr 686 Westminster

Pg. 1031, col. 2:
New York System (Gust Pappas) restr 424 Smith


PROVIDENCE (RI) CITY DIRECTORY 1932

Pg. 1035, col. 2:
New York Hot Weiners (Aaron Krasner) lunch room 710 Westminster

Pg. 1036, col. 1:
New York System (Gust Pappas) restr 424 Smith


PROVIDENCE (RI) CITY DIRECTORY 1933

Pg. 958, col. 2:
New System Lunch 10 Pine
New York Hot Weiners 710 Westminster
New York Restaurant 86 Chestnut
New York System 424 Smith


11 October 1987, Providence Journal, (http://www.projo.com), pg. M-16:

THE UNBEATABLE NEW YORK SYSTEM:

The Pappas family weiners (sic) have been a Rhode Island
treasure for 60 years

by THOMAS J. MORGAN

(...) The business was founded in 1927 by his grandfather Gust Pappas, who died in 1936. (...)

"New York System," Gust Pappas tries to explain, isn't a chain. There are any number of them around, but all are operated by Pappas relatives, many of whom learned the secrets of the business (and of the sauce) during their apprenticeship on Smith Hill. (...)

"There is a distinct difference between hot dogs and wieners," according to Ernie Pappas. But, he says, a true wiener is more than just a sausage. "It's the condiments too," he says. "The chili sauce is the most important," he says, oblivious of having just tipped off part of the secret recipe, "with the fresh chopped onions and celery salt. You have to cook a wiener--you don't give it raw, or well done. You have to just make it luscious. When you stick the fork in there to pick it up and put it on the bun, it just oozes with juice. I still love them after so many years. That's the best part of it, boy, I tell you."(...)




Posted by Barry Popik
Food/Drink • (0) Comments • Saturday, July 24, 2004 • Permalink