A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

Recent entries:
“What’s a KKK member’s favorite donut?"/"White powder.” (8/16)
Entry forthcoming—B.P. (8/16)
“What do you call an eternity?"/"Four blondes in four cars at a four way stop.” (8/16)
“Keep your friends close and your wine glass closer” (8/16)
“What do you get when you cross an onion with a donkey?” (joke) (8/16)
More new entries...

A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z


Entry from October 22, 2010
National Propaganda Radio (NPR or National Public Radio nickname)

NPR (formerly National Public Radio) is funded, in part, with taxpayer dollars. Conservative groups have often cited that NPR has a pro-liberal bias. Some critics have nicknamed NPR “National Propaganda Radio” since at least 1989.

Other NPR nicknames include “National Pinko Radio” (cited in print since at least 1990), “National Palestinian Radio” (cited in print since at least 1993), “Nationalized Public Radio” (cited in print since at least 1995) and “National Pubic Radio” (cited in print since at least 2002).


Wikipedia: NPR
NPR, formerly National Public Radio, is a privately and publicly funded non-profit membership media organization that serves as a national syndicator to 797 public radio stations in the United States of America. NPR was created in 1970, following congressional passage of the Public Broadcasting Act of 1967. This act was signed into law by President Lyndon B. Johnson, and established the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, which also created the Public Broadcasting Service in addition to NPR. A CPB organizing committee under John Witherspoon first created a Board of Directors chaired by Bernard Mayes. This Board then hired Donald Quayle to be the first President of NPR with studios in Washington D.C., 30 employees and 90 public radio stations as charter members.

NPR produces and distributes news and cultural programming. Individual public radio stations are not required to broadcast all NPR programs that are produced. Most public radio stations broadcast a mixture of NPR programs, content from rival providers American Public Media and Public Radio International and Public Radio Exchange, and locally produced programs. NPR’s flagships are two drive time news broadcasts, Morning Edition and the afternoon All Things Considered; both are carried by most NPR member stations, and from 2002–2008 they were the second and third most popular radio programs in the country. In a Harris poll conducted in 2005, NPR was voted the most trusted news source in the U.S.

NPR manages the Public Radio Satellite System, which distributes NPR programs and other programming from independent producers and networks such as American Public Media and Public Radio International.

3 January 1989, Colorado SPrings (CO) Gazette-Telegraph, “Here’s a budget story for NPR” (editorial), pg. D2:
These government media are more than wasted money. They’re also propaganda aimed at the American people. NPR, for example, says it exists to report the news with “fairness, accuracy, timeliness.” But the network might better be called National Propaganda Radio. New Republic senior editor Fred Barnes reports that in NPR’s “lengthy background pieces, cultural reports, interviews by anchors, and commentaries, the left-wing agenda dominates.”

Google Groups: alt.radio.networks.pr
Newsgroups: alt.radio.networks.npr
From: (Okechukwu Chima Echeruo)
Date: Mon, 30 May 1994 18:07:22 GMT
Local: Mon, May 30 1994 1:07 pm
Subject: NPR: National Propaganda Radio

Hi,

Am I the only one who thinks that NPR is full of propaganda that supports the government, big business and “new age” organizations. And since when did they start accepting money from organizations with an interest in shaping public opinion?

Google Groups: alt.radio.networks.pr
Newsgroups: alt.radio.networks.npr
From: (JED)
Date: 1997/11/09
Subject: NPR = National Propaganda Radio?

And if I had more time, the list could go on and on.  All national journalists suck.  Rush Limbaugh-quality broadcasts aren’t the exception, they’re the rule, even at National Propaganda Radio.

Daily Pundit
National Propaganda Radio
September 26th 2007

The Busted Nut
October 21st, 2010
The Hypocrisy of NPR (National Propaganda Radio)

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityGovernment/Law/Politics/Military • Friday, October 22, 2010 • Permalink