A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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Entry from May 09, 2017
Mardi Gras City (New Orleans nickname)

Entry in progress—B.P.

Other New Orleans nicknames include “America’s Most Interesting City,” “Baghdad-on-the-Bayou,” “Big Easy,” “City That Care Forgot,” “Crescent City,” “Gateway of the Mississippi Valley,” “Hollywood South,” “Metropolis of the South,” “N’Awlins,” “No Orleans” (after Hurricane Katrina), “NOLA,” “Northernmost Caribbean City” and “Paris of America.”


Wikipedia: New Orleans
New Orleans (/nuː ˈɔːrlᵻnz, -ˈɔːrli.ənz, -ɔːrˈliːnz/, or /ˈnɔːrlᵻnz/; French: La Nouvelle-Orléans [la nuvɛlɔʁleɑ̃] ( listen)) is a major United States port and the largest city and metropolitan area in the state of Louisiana. The population of the city was 343,829 as of the 2010 U.S. Census. The New Orleans metropolitan area (New Orleans–Metairie–Kenner Metropolitan Statistical Area) had a population of 1,167,764 in 2010 and was the 46th largest in the United States. The New Orleans–Metairie–Bogalusa Combined Statistical Area, a larger trading area, had a 2010 population of 1,452,502.
(...)
Entertainment and performing arts
The New Orleans area is home to numerous celebrations, the most popular of which is Carnival, often referred to as Mardi Gras. Carnival officially begins on the Feast of the Epiphany, also known as the “Twelfth Night”. Mardi Gras (French for “Fat Tuesday"), the final and grandest day of festivities, is the last Tuesday before the Catholic liturgical season of Lent, which commences on Ash Wednesday.

Mardi Gras History
The earliest reference to Mardi Gras “Carnival” appears in a 1781 report to the Spanish colonial governing body. That year, the Perseverance Benevolent & Mutual Aid Association was the first of hundreds of clubs and carnival organizations formed in New Orleans.

By the late 1830s, New Orleans held street processions of maskers with carriages and horseback riders to celebrate Mardi Gras. Dazzling gaslight torches, or “flambeaux,” lit the way for the krewe’s members and lent each event an exciting air of romance and festivity. In 1856, six young Mobile natives formed the Mistick Krewe of Comus, invoking John Milton’s hero Comus to represent their organization. Comus brought magic and mystery to New Orleans with dazzling floats (known as tableaux cars) and masked balls. Krewe members remained anonymous.

In 1870, Mardi Gras’ second Krewe, the Twelfth Night Revelers, was formed. This is also the first recorded account of Mardi Gras “throws.”

OCLC WorldCat record
City of the Mardi gras
Author: Harry L De Vore; Martin Yoseloff
Publisher: New York, Beechhurst Press, B. Ackerman, Inc. [1946]
Edition/Format: eBook : Document : English
Subjects
New Orleans (La.)—Pictorial works.
Louisiana—New Orleans.

Twitter
Phillip Porter‏
@jmpsporter
4 DAYS TO “The Big Easy” - “The Birthplace of Jazz” - “The Mardi Gras City” - New Orleans!!! GU Oasis Cases going… http://fb.me/2cPoqn3cl
9:17 AM - 7 Aug 2015

Posted by Barry Popik
Nicknames of Other PlacesBig Easy, City That Care Forgot (New Orleans nicknames) • Tuesday, May 09, 2017 • Permalink