A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

Recent entries:
“I haven’t seen faith move mountains, but I have seen what faith can do to buildings” (8/22)
“What did the Jedi order at the Italian restaurant?"/"Only one cannoli.” (8/22)
“If self driving cars become a huge industry, ice cream trucks will be mobile vending machines” (8/22)
“Paper money is cold hard cash. A credit/debit card is hold card cash” (8/22)
“Vegans think people who sell meat are disgusting, but people who sell fruit and veg are grocer” (8/22)
More new entries...

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Entry from December 31, 2015
Little Pittsburgh (East New York, Brooklyn)

Entry in progress—B.P.

Another New York City “Little Pittsburgh” is Hunts Point, in the Bronx.

Wikipedia: East New York, Brooklyn
East New York is a residential neighborhood in the eastern section of the borough of Brooklyn in New York City, United States. The neighborhood is part of Brooklyn Community District 5, covered by Brooklyn Community Board 5. Its boundaries, starting from the north and moving clockwise are: Cypress Hills Cemetery to the north, the Borough of Queens to the east, Jamaica Bay to the south, and the Bay Ridge Branch railway tracks next to Van Sinderen Avenue to the west. Linden Boulevard and Atlantic Avenue are the primary thoroughfares through East New York. ZIP codes include 11207, 11208, and 11239. The area is patrolled by the 75th Precinct located at 1000 Sutter Avenue. New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) property in the area is patrolled by P.S.A. 2. During the latter part of the twentieth century, East New York came to be predominantly inhabited by African Americans and Latinos.

New York (NY) Times
METRO MATTERS; Manufacturing Reclaims Pasture In East New York
By SAM ROBERTS
Published: July 30, 1987
Vacant land has been so abundant for so long in the East New York section of Brooklyn that the horse grazing until recently in a pastoral lot on Williams Avenue hardly seemed out of place.
(...)
The shelter shares space in the former school with the Local Development Corporation of East New York, whose executive director, Richard Recny, has been working for eight years to restore the nearby fallow fields to the manufacturing, warehousing and metal-fabricating complex that once earned this neighborhood the nickname ‘’Little Pittsburgh.’’

Google Books
American Ruins
By Camilo José Vergara
New York, NY: Monacelli Press
1999
Pg. 72:
For two decades I have observed a two- block-long strip that borders Sutter Avenue along Brooklyn’s L subway line. I first visited East New York to see the last remnants of a crumbling neighborhood once called Little Pittsburgh.

NYC.gov
Sustainable Communities
East New York

Department of City Planning
The City of New York
2014
Pg. 14:
Meanwhile the industrial district originally established by Colonel Pitkin continued to thrive, offering employment for residents of the burgeoning neighborhoods around it. This industrial district remained vital throughout the early twentieth century, when East New York was known as Brooklyn’s “Little Pittsburgh” due to its high concentration of industrial uses including steel fabrication. The industrial area was served by a north-south freight and passenger rail line running at grade at Van Sinderen Avenue. Factories, lofts and warehouses developed around this line, mixed with new dense tenements. Known today as the Bay Ridge line, this rail line connected Sunnyside, Queens, with the Bay Ridge-Sunset Park industrial waterfront. 

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityNeighborhoods • Thursday, December 31, 2015 • Permalink