A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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Entry from September 23, 2009
King of Condiments (ketchup; mustard; salsa; shoyu; Tabasco)

Ketchup, King of Condiments was the title of a 2004 PBS documentary film. Although ketchup has long been regarded as the king of American condiments, the title has not been without serious challenges.

Mustard was the first “king of condiments.” A trademarked product called Mustardyne advertised itself as “The King of Condiments” in 1886. Colburn’s Philadelphia Mustard advertised itself as “King of Condiments” in 1889. Maple syrup was called “king of the condiments at the breakfast table” in 1896. Tabasco advertised as “The King of Condiments” in 1932.

Heinz Tomato Ketchup advertised as “The King of All Condiments” in 1949. By 1992, salsa sales surpassed ketchup sales in the United States, making it the new “king of condiments.”


Google Books
6 March 1886, The Lancet, pg. 28, col. 1 ad:
NO TABLE COMPLETE WITHOUT
“MUSTARDYNE,” [TRADE MARK REGISTERED]
THE KING OF CONDIMENTS.

3 January 1889, Freeborn County Standard (Albert Lea, MN), pg. 13, col. 5 ad:
COLBURN’S PHILADELPHIA MUSTARD
KING OF CONDIMENTS.
A TABLE LUXURY.
BEST FOR MEDICAL USES.

8 January 1896, Waterloo (IA) Daily Courier, pg. 3, col. 3:
NOW COMES MAPLE SIRUP.
A Million Dollars Invested in the In-
dustry—Large Revenue for Vermont.

This is the time of year when maple sirup takes its proper place as king of the condiments at the breakfast table, says the New York World. It comes with buckwheat cakes and fried hominy.

6 May 1932, Clovis (NM) Evening News-Journal, pg. 8, col. 3 ad:
TABASCO
THE KING OF CONDIMENTS
ASK AMERICAN HOUSEWIVES.
ASK ALL FAMOUS CHEFS.

5 March 1937, Oakland (CA) Tribune, pg. 34, col. 7 ad:
Choice meats flavored with Angostura, the king of condiments.

11 August 1949, Connellsville (PA) Daily Courier, pg. 14, col. 6 ad:
HEINZ TOMATO KETCHUP
The King of All Condiments

25 September 1974, Billings (MT) Gazette, “Mustard quality dips” by Addison Bragg, pg. H7, col. 3:
It’s still lacking in the robust, eye-watering character which once made it King of the Condiments.

5 March 1992, Chicago (IL) Daily Herald, sec. 6, pg. 4, col. 1:
Hot ‘n’ spicy Mexican sauces
oust ketchup from top spot

SAN ANTONIO, Texas—For more than 100 years, ketchup has been the king of condiments in American refrigerators, but not that’s changed. Mexican sauces—picante sauce and salsa—have outsold ketchup in retail sales forthe first time, according to a preliminary sales report.

Only five years ago, ketchup was outselling Mexican sauces by $200 million. But industry research shows picante sauce and salsa have become hot items, with sales growing 14 percent in 1991 and surpassing ketchup sales by $40 million. The numbers were released today in a preliminary report by Packages Facts, Inc., a New York-based market research firm.

OCLC WorldCat record
Ketchup king of condiments
Author: Tom Zapiecki; H. J. Heinz Company
Publisher: Bowling Green, Ohio : WBGU, 2004.
Edition/Format: DVD video : Japanese
Summary: Discover the fascinating history of ketchup and the H. J. Heinz Co. plant in Bowling Green, Ohio. Includes 40 minutes of bonus material condensed into ketchup packets of information to explore the lore and delve further into the world of ketchup. 

OCLC WorldCat record
King of condiments, Colonel Mustard does it in the kitchen
Author: R Nalley
Edition/Format: Article : English
Publication: FORBES, 179, no. 13, SUPP (2007): 105-106

OCLC WorldCat record
Japanese foods that heal : using traditional japanese ingredients to promote health, longevity and well-being
Author: John Belleme; Jan Belleme
Publisher: Rutland, VT : Tuttle, 2007.
Edition/Format: Book : English
Contents: Miso, a health secret to savor—Toasted sesame oil, the cooking oil supreme—Shoyu, king of condiments

10 January 2007, New Jersey Herald (Newton, NJ), pg. A10, col. 2 photo caption:
Fry sauce, the king of condiments in Utah, is spreading across the nation.

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityFood/Drink • (0) Comments • Wednesday, September 23, 2009 • Permalink