A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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Entry from March 09, 2008
Kicker (Shit-kicker or Shitkicker)

Entry in Progress—B.P.


Urban Dictionary
1. Kicker
Another term for a hick or a redneck. The term is usually used for high school guys. They tend to wear their Wranglers inside their boots and they are all seen dipping at school at least once. They are also loud, they drink a lot of alcohol, they’re wanna be players, and they all drive loud trucks with sound systems. Also, they all have stickers of the rebel flag somewhere on their truck, and they always yell “GIT HER DUN”!!
I went to Walmart the other day and I passed a bunch of kickers that were dipping by their trucks.
by Stina Bo Bina *^*^*TeXaS *^*^* May 2, 2005
(...)
12. Kicker
Derived from “shit kickers” or cowboy boots. Used to describe persons who wear these boots who are usually rednecks or hicks.
Damn kickers and their loud ass country music!
by Brian Kitchens NC Feb 26, 2006

(Dictionary of American Regional English)
kicker n
A red neck; a cowboy or would-be cowboy. CF. shit-kicker
1986 Pederson LAGS Concordance ce,csTX, 1 inf, Kicker—runs around in cowboy hat, pickup truck; 1 inf, Kicker = a cowboy?; 1 inf, Kicker shirt—cowboy wears, Western pearl snaps; (A rustic) 1 inf, Kicker—same as “red-neck,” in rodeo, wears boots; I’m not a kicker—why he avoids Western clothes; 1 inf, Kicker—a cowboy or Westerner; 1 inf, Kicker—likes Western clothes and music; 1 inf, Kicker—short for “shit kicker”; 1 inf, Cow kicker—cowboy; (Poor Whites) 1 inf, Kicker, shit kicker, wears boots, a dude—pejorative; kicker music—country and western; (A dance) 1 inf, Kicker dance—could be square dancing or rock; 1 inf, Kicker dancing—same as Western dancing; (Music) 1 inf, Kicker music—country and western, slow dance.

(Historical Dictionary of American Slang)
kicker n
Esp. S.W. a countryman; SHITKICKER.
1976 Nat. Lampoon (July) 76: Pickers ‘N’ Kickers.
1980 American Speech (Fall) 200.
1981 N.Y. Post (Dec. 14) 25: “Kicker Culture”—all about drinkin’ and dancin’, Texas music and mechanical bulls.
1986 in DARE: Kicker—runs around in cowboy hat, pickup truck.

(Dictionary of American Regional English)
shit-kicker Also shit-stomper
1 A man’s boot, esp one with a sharp toe; see quots. CF kicker n 2.
1966-69 DARE (Qu. W11, Men’s low, rough work shoes) Infs IN75, MI19, PA167, Shit-kickers.
1975 American Speech 50.66 AR (as of c1970), Shit stompers..1: Cowboy boots. 2:Cowboys.
1986 Pederson LAGS Concordance, 1 inf, esTN, shit kickers—boots.
1991 DARE FIle wNE, Dallas TX. There are two kinds of boots, both of which have pointed toes: kickers and shit-kickers. Men wore kickers for dancing...Shit-kickers are your everyday work boots, and that’s what they’re called, “shit-kickers.” They’re made out of horse hide or ordinary leather. People wore shit-kickers in western Nebraska to obut out there nobody had kickers.
1992 Ibid csWI, I bought a pair of men’s used lace-up black boots, they laced up above my ankle bones. When I showed my beautiful new boots to a friend, he said, “Shit-kickers, how post modern.” I said, “Why call them that?” He said, “Because that’s what they are, they’re shit-kickers, work boots.” I said, “Would you call them ‘kickers?’” he said, “They’re not kickers, they’re shit-kickers.”
1994 Ibid nwKS (as of 1960s) He had on a pair of shit-stompers (=cowboy boots).
1998 Ibid eKS (as of 1980s), Shit-kicker—Growing up in the northeast (Topeka), I heard this word used to refer to sharp-toed boots, esp. cowboy boots, the implication being that they could be used to kick the ___ out of someone. “He better watch out, ‘cause I’m gonna be wearin’ my shit-kickers.” In any case, they were never work boots, and were usually stylish enough for school, parties, dancing, etc.
2 A red-neck n2; a cowboy or would-be cowboy Cf kicker n4.
1964 PADS 42.29 Chicago IL, Any rustic..shit kicker.
1968 DARE (Qu. HH1, Names and nicknames for a rustic or countrified person) Infs NY93, PA161, WI57, Shit-kicker.
1969 Rolling Stone 28 June 14 CA, [Country music] has also been called shitkicker music and white man’s blues.
1975 [see 1 above].
1986 Pederson LAGS Concordance (Poor Whites—black man’s terms) 1 inf, ceTX, Shit kicker—wants to be [a] cowboy, doesn’t know how; 1 inf, ceTX, SHit kicker—insult; (Poor whites—white man’s terms) i inf, cs TX, Shit-kicker—works around a ranch; (A rustic) 1 inf, csTX, Children call [a] cowboy shit kicker—new word; 1 inf, csTX, Shit kicker—wears cowboy hat, has pickup truck.

(OCLC WorldCat record)
Title: Shitkickers and other Texas stories /
Author(s): Weathers, Carolyn. 
Publication: Los Angeles : Clothespin Fever Press,
Year: 1987
Description: 61 p. ; 20 cm.
Language: English
Contents: 1. You bring the Bible, I’ll bring the booze—2. Shitkickers : on the Texas honkeytonk trail in L.A.—3. Cheers, everybody!

(OCLC WorldCat record)
Title: Shitkicker monologues :
monologues in the language of rural America, from the stage play “Ross County people” /
Author(s): Karshner, Roger.
Karshner, Roger. ; Ross County people.
Publication: Toluca Lake, Calif. : Dramaline Publications,
Year: 1987
Description: iv, 37 p. ; 22 cm.

Posted by Barry Popik
Texas (Lone Star State Dictionary) • (1) Comments • Sunday, March 09, 2008 • Permalink


In the song “Return of the Grievous Angel” by Gram Parsons, which appears on his 1973 album Grievous Angel, the following lyric occurs twice: “Out with the truckers and the kickers and the cowboy angels.”

It’s not the earliest instance, but still a good attestation to this use of the word, at that time.

Cheers.

Posted by GTJacobs  on  02/28  at  02:56 AM

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