A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

Recent entries:
“As I get older, I remember all the people I’ve lost. Maybe a tour guide career wasn’t for me” (8/17)
“You should get an employee discount for using self-checkout in a store” (8/17)
“I felt bad, but then I installed a new version of office. It improved my outlook” (8/17)
Entry forthcoming—B.P. (8/17)
Entry forthcoming—B.P. (8/17)
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Entry from June 28, 2008
Jew Gardens (Kew Gardens)

Kew Gardens in Queens became home to a large community of Jewish refugees from World War II. “Jew Gardens” is a nickname for Kew Gardens that perhaps was in use in the 1950s. Kew Gardens is now one of the most ethnically diverse neighborhoods in the country and the politically incorrect—and factually incorrect—nickname “Jew Gardens” is seldom used.


Wikipedia: Kew Gardens, Queens
Kew Gardens is a neighborhood in central Queens bounded to the north and east by the Jackie Robinson Parkway (formerly Interborough Parkway), the Van Wyck Expressway, and Queens Boulevard, also to the east by 127th Street, to the south by 85th Avenue, and to the west by Babbage Street and Park Lane South. Forest Park and the neighborhood of Forest Hills lie to the west. Jamaica lies to some extreme parts of the South East and Briarwood along the south. The neighborhood is part of Queens Community Board 9.

Much of the area was acquired in 1868 by Albon P. Man, who developed the neighborhood of Hollis Hill to the south, chiefly along Jamaica Avenue, while leaving undeveloped the hilly land to the north.
(...)
Diversity
Kew Gardens is one of the most ethnically diverse neighborhoods in the country. A large community of Jewish refugees from Germany took shape in the area after the Second World War. The neighborhood attracted many Chinese immigrants after 1965, about 2,500 Iranian Jews arrived after the Iranian Revolution of 1979, and immigrants from China, Pakistan, Iran, Afghanistan, Israel, the former Soviet Union, India, Bangladesh, Colombia, Peru, Venezuela, and Korea settled in Kew Gardens during the 1980s and 1990s. Currently, Kew Gardens has a growing African American and Latino population, as well as Bukharian Jews from Uzbekistan, alongside a significant Orthodox Jewish community. Most recently, Guyanese people from Ozone Park and Richmond Hill have moved to Kew Gardens. Other groups of West Indians such as people from Trinidad and Tobago, Barbados, and Jamaica, among others have moved to Kew Gardens in lesser amounts. Many immigrants from Central America, and South America call Kew Gardens their home.

The neighborhood is also teeming with airline personnel because of its proximity to New York’s two largest airports. The increase of the Korean population followed the renovation and rededication of the First Church of Kew Gardens, which offers Korean-language services. The local public school, P.S. 99 Queens, has a substantial Hispanic and East Asian population. Kew Gardens is also economically diverse: it is predominantly lower class to upper middle class, but also sees residents at the more extreme ends of the spectrum. Even the local cuisine reflects this diversity in Kew Gardens with Russian, Italian, Indian, Pakistani, Uzbek, Mexican and Peruvian dining available to residents and visitors. In recent years, young professionals and Manhattanites looking for greenery, park-like atmosphere and spacious apartments have moved to the area. Kew Gardens continues to change as these families move in.

Uncyclopedia: Queens
Some Queens neighborhoods, such as Ozone Layer, Baywatch, Massive Pecs, Jew Gardens and Woodstock are home to a very diverse mix of many different nationalities.

Google Books
Sexual Harassment: Women Speak Out
edited by Amber Coverdale Sumrall and Dena Taylor
Freedom, CA: Crossing Press
1992
Pg. 224:
Some people called it Jew Gardens, because of the many, many refugees there.

Google Groups: alt.sports.basketball.pro.ny-knicks
Newsgroups: alt.sports.basketball.pro.ny-knicks
From: “Dave Pelland” Date: 1998/01/10
Subject: Re: Dave Pelland

>>You are really impressed by yourself and your little fag friends in the
>>Knicks newsgroup. Did you declare yourself the winner of our verbal
>>sparring or did your little fag friends. You stay in Jew Gardens and I’ll
>>gladly stay in Hotlanta where I own a 5000 sq. ft. home that you could
only
>>dream of owning in Kew Gardens. New York is the cespool of the universe.

Google Groups: rec.music.hip-hop
Newsgroups: rec.music.hip-hop
From: (Tony1er)
Date: 2000/05/10
Subject: Re: OTP:Advice: how do i get her to bounce?

where do you live, man? I lived in Ridgwuss, Queens until very recently. I now live in Jew Gardens.

swankyearl (Livejournal)
Ed, Man of La Mancha (swankyearl) wrote,
@ 2004-12-08 19:55:00
Oh man
I saw like the greatest thing today. I was walking home from Jew Gardens, and I see this skinny black guy.

Archinect: Discussion Forum
metamechanic(fan)
02/25/07 11:37
(...)
Queens:
Astoria (Greek)
Flushing (Asian)
Long Island City (the new location for strip clubs and temp MOMA)
Maspeth (that pretty much eximplifies Queens to me)
Kew Gardens (also known as Jew Gardens)

I Saw Your Nanny
She smiles in her face and...
Received Tuesday, June 12, 2007
(...)
Anonymous said…
JMT why are you still friends with these people? I am black, my fiance is Jewish and we live in Howard Beach in Queens. It is racist over there. Its mostly the Italian women that seem to have a problem with me. Most of the Italian guys want to get with me. In 05 there was that teen that beat up a black kid in the neighborhood. Caused a whole big stir. It was crazy! My fiance grew up in that neighborhood. They have no problems with jewish people living there. Black people they have a problem with. The area that I live in is almost all Mafia (I live 2 blocks away from Gotti’s old house) most of them don’t like black people. The only reason why we have not moved yet is because we inherited the house from his parents. They moved to Kew Gardens which is nicknamed (by jewish people) “Jew Gardens”
10:28 AM

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityNeighborhoods • (0) Comments • Saturday, June 28, 2008 • Permalink