A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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Entry from December 22, 2010
“It’s no disgrace to be poor, but it might as well be”

Kin Hubbard (1868-1930) drew the popular “Abe Martin Says” one-panel newspaper comic. Many sayings became widely quoted.

“It’s no disgrace t’ be poor, but it might as well be” was first printed on October 9, 1911.

“Poverty is not a disgrace, but it’s terribly inconvenient” is a related saying.


Wikipedia: Kin Hubbard
Frank McKinney Hubbard (born 1 September 1868 in Bellefontaine, Ohio - died: 26 December 1930 in Indianapolis, Indiana) was an American cartoonist, humorist, and journalist better known by his pen name “Kin" Hubbard.

He was creator of the cartoon “Abe Martin of Brown County” which ran in U.S. newspapers from 1904 until his death in 1930, and was the originator of many political quips that remain in use. North American humorist Will Rogers reportedly declared Kin to be “America’s greatest humorist.”

Wikiquote: Poverty
Poverty is a state in which an individual, group, or population lack essential elements of life within their societies. This usually has the connotation of a lack of basic survival items like food, clothing, shelter, and health care, or the financial means to obtain these, but can also mean having less tangible problems like social exclusion, dependency, and the ability to participate in society. Its exact meaning varies considerably with context and the social environments involved.

Source
Poverty is no disgrace to a man, but it is confoundedly inconvenient.
. Reverend Samuel F. Smith (1808-1895), American Baptist minister and author. His Wit and Wisdom
. Reverend Sydney Smith (1771 - 1845), British clergyman, essayist and wit

To be broke is not a disgrace, it is only a catastrophe.
. Rex Stout, as stated by the character, Nero Wolfe in The League of Frightened Men (1935)
(...)
Anonymous
Poverty is no disgrace, but it’s a great inconvenience.
. English Proverb (16th Century)

9 October 1911, Harrisburg (PA) Patriot, “Abe Martin,” pg. 6, col. 6:
It’s no disgrace t’ be poor but it might as well be.
Did you ever notice that th’ most disoblidgin’ folks t’ deal with hold positions that anybuddy could fill?

Google Books
Short Furrows
By Kin Hubbard
Indianapolis, IN: The Bobbs-Merrill Co.
1911
Pg. 42:
It’s no disgrace t’ be poor, but it might as well be.

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityBanking/Finance/Insurance • Wednesday, December 22, 2010 • Permalink