A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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Entry from January 11, 2012
“I’ll believe corporations are people when Texas executes one”

“I’ll believe corporations are people when Texas executes one” has been cited in print since at least September 2011 and was popularly used on signs in the Occupy Wall Street movement during the fall of 2011. The saying has been used by anti-capitalist movements and people specifically objecting to the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission (2010), which allowed corporate and union money in politics.


Wikipedia: Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission
Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, 558 U.S. 08-205 (2010), 558 U.S. ––––, 130 S.Ct. 876 (January 21, 2010), was a landmark decision by the United States Supreme Court holding that the First Amendment prohibits government from placing limits on independent spending for political purposes by corporations and unions. The 5–4 decision originated in a dispute over whether the non-profit corporation Citizens United could air a film critical of Hillary Clinton, and whether the group could advertise the film in broadcast ads featuring Clinton’s image, in apparent violation of the 2002 Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act, commonly known as the McCain–Feingold Act in reference to its primary Senate sponsors.

Drudge Retort
I read this quote over the weekend:
“I will accept the Supreme Court’s decision and believe corporations are people when Texas executes one of them.”
Posted by moder8 at 2011-09-19 12:19 PM

Democratic Underground
misanthrope
Wed Sep-21-11 01:43 PM
“I’ll believe a corporation is a person when Texas executes one.”
Stolen from Twitter.

Emporia (KS) Gazette
Corporations are people?
Bob Grover, Emporia
Friday, September 23, 2011
(...)
COMMENTS
mslater (Matt Slater) says…
I’ll believe a Corporation is a person when Texas executes one.
September 23, 2011 at 10:27 p.m.

Aspen (CO) Times
Sunday, October 2, 2011
John Colson: Hit and Run
Is that a glimmer of possibility and hope on Wall Street?

(...)
Oh, and my short and far from complete list of what’s wrong in this country, way up near the top of this screed?

I caught a bumper sticker recently about one aspect of that list, which read, “I’ll believe corporations are people when Texas executes one.”

As they say on Facebook, I like that.

D Magaine (Dallas, TX)
Two Days, Two “Occupy Dallas” Protests, Two Very Different Groups, Ctd.
Posted on October 6th, 2011 3:15pm by Michael J. Mooney
Yesterday we talked about the two different groups “occupying” Dallas this week. A few reviews of today’s protest here (behind the paywall) and here. Estimated attendance: about 500. Best sign: “I’ll believe corporations are people when Texas executes one.”

NPR: All Things Considered
What Is The Basis For Corporate Personhood?
October 24, 2011
MELISSA BLOCK, host: Among the demands of Occupy Wall Street protestors is this, an end to corporate personhood. That demand has been spelled out on protestors signs, like one that reads: I’ll believe corporations are people when Texas executes one. Corporate personhood has underpinnings in legal doctrine.

The Goodis Center | Blog
“When Texas Executes One” : Occupy Wall Street and the effects of corporate personhood
Posted on November 4, 2011
by Megan Towey
(...)
When I visited Zuccotti Park, the epicenter of the Occupy protests, on Oct. 15, I saw a few signs sporting this slogan: “I’ll believe corporations are people when Texas executes one.” Even though a metaphysical execution, corporations have been “executed” for violating human rights laws.

Posted by Barry Popik
Texas (Lone Star State Dictionary) • (0) Comments • Wednesday, January 11, 2012 • Permalink