A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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“Yo mama is so fat, when she went skydiving she caused an eclipse” (8/20)
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Entry from April 15, 2013
“If Congress has the right under the Constitution to issue paper money …”

President Andrew Jackson (1767-1845) said in a July 10, 1832 Veto Message Regarding the Bank of the United States:

“The money so coined, with its value so regulated, and such foreign coins as Congress may adopt are the only currency known to the Constitution. But if they have other power to regulate the currency, it was conferred to be exercised by themselves, and not to be transferred to a corporation.’

By at least 1882, this became:

“If congress has the right, under the constitution to issue paper money, it was given them to be used by themselves, not delegated to corporations or individuals.”

Jackson’s line is now frequently given as, “If congress has the right under the Constitution to issue paper money, it was given them to use themselves, not to be delegated to individuals or corporations.”


Wikiquote: Andrew Jackson
Andrew Jackson (15 March 1767 – 8 June 1845) was the seventh President of the United States (1829-1837), hero of the Battle of New Orleans (1815), a founder of the Democratic Party, and the eponym of the era of Jacksonian democracy.
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It is maintained by some that the bank is a means of executing the constitutional power “to coin money and regulate the value thereof.” Congress have established a mint to coin money and passed laws to regulate the value thereof. The money so coined, with its value so regulated, and such foreign coins as Congress may adopt are the only currency known to the Constitution. But if they have other power to regulate the currency, it was conferred to be exercised by themselves, and not to be transferred to a corporation. If the bank be established for that purpose, with a charter unalterable without its consent, Congress have parted with their power for a term of years, during which the Constitution is a dead letter. It is neither necessary nor proper to transfer its legislative power to such a bank, and therefore unconstitutional.
. Veto Message Regarding the Bank of the United States (10 July 1832)
. Often paraphrased as: If Congress has the right under the constitution to issue paper money, it was given them to be used by themselves, not to be delegated to individuals or corporations.

Google News Archive
23 September 1882, The News Reporter (Three Rivers, PA), “Testimony of Patriots,” pg. 1, col. 4:
SHOULD BE BASED ON CREDIT.
If congress has the right, under the constitution to issue paper money, it was given them to be used by themselves, not delegated to corporations or individuals. I wish all the money of the nation, whether gold, silver, copper or paper, based not upon coin or other money, but upon the credit and resources of the country.—Andrew Jackson.

Google Books
The Money Monopoly
By E. R. Baker
Des Moines, IA: George A. Miller, printer and binder
1892
Pg. 141:
Andrew Jackson said:

“If congress has the right under the constitution to issue paper money, it was given them to be used by themselves, not to be delegated to individuals or corporations.”

TomWoods.com
April 15, 2013
The Greenbackers’ Fake Quote Industry
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Here’s another one, this one supposedly by Andrew Jackson: “If congress has the right under the Constitution to issue paper money, it was given them to use themselves, not to be delegated to individuals or corporations.”

Want to find me a primary source on that?
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COMMENTS
barrypopik • 9 hours ago
This is a great article, but the last line is actually very close to what Andrew Jackson once said:
http://barrypopik.com/index.ph…

Tom Woods Mod barrypopik • 6 hours ago
The wording is similar, but changing “coins” to “paper money” isn’t exactly a subtle, non-ideological shift!

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityGovernment/Law/Politics/Military • Monday, April 15, 2013 • Permalink