A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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Entry forthcoming—B.P. (10/15)
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Entry from March 16, 2017
“I have the right to remain silent, but I don’t have the ability”

A Miranda warning is given by law enforcement officers, telling an accused that he or she has the right to remain silent. American stand up comedian and actor Ron White wrote a book, I Had the Right to Remain Silent But I Didn’t Have the Ability (2006), from a line that White had used in his act since at least 2000. White used the line to describe an incident when he got throw out of a New York City bar.

“I had the right to remain silent, but being Irish I didn’t have the ability” is a jocular variation that has been printed on many images. The Irish version was posted on Twitter on June 19, 2015.


Wikipedia: Miranda warning
The Miranda warningwhich can also be referred to as the Miranda rights, is a right to silence warning given by police in the United States to criminal suspects in police custody (or in a custodial interrogation) before they are interrogated to preserve the admissibility of their statements against them in criminal proceedings.

Wikipedia: Ron White
Ronald Dee “Ron” “Tater Salad” White (born December 18, 1956) is an American stand up comedian and actor, best known as a charter member of the Blue Collar Comedy Tour. Nicknamed “Tater Salad”, he is the author of the book I Had the Right to Remain Silent But I Didn’t Have the Ability (Dutton 2006, ISBN 978-0-525-94961-9), which appeared on the New York Times best seller list.

6 March 2000, St. Louis (MO) Post-Dispatch, “Blue Collar Comics Score With Colorful Southern Tales” by Pat Derfler, pg. B2:
Foxworthy also saved his breadwinner for an encore that saw the quartet sharing the stage and exchanging stories. White reminisced about a drunken conversation with police officials, where he “had the right to remain silent, but didn’t have the ability.”

27 June 2003, Atlanta (GA) Journal-Constitution, “Comic happy second fiddle to Foxworthy” by Richard L. Eldredge, pg. G2:
One of his funniest: A very drunk White got thrown out of a New York City bar for wearing a hat. When the cops came, “I had the right to remain silent,” he said. “I just didn’t have the ability.”

OCLC WorldCat record
I had the right to remain silent-- but I didnt have the ability
Author: Ron White
Publisher: New York, N.Y., U.S.A. : Dutton, ©2006.
Edition/Format: Print book : Biography : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database: WorldCat
Summary:
Moving from the Blue Collar Comedy Tour to the printed page, Ron White (affectionately known as “Tater Salad") delivers the laughs in his distinctive down-home style. He riffs on everything from obnoxious designer sunglass salesmen to his wife’s wealthy but stingy family, and revisits some of his most famous characters, such as his troublesome dog Sluggo.--From publisher description.

Twitter
Carmel Corrigan‏
@CorriganSays
I have the right to remain silent but been IRISH I don’t have the ability 😉😉😉 today’s quote.
5:03 PM - 19 Jun 2015

Twitter
Jo Coll‏
@JoColl2
“Legally, I have the right to remain silent… Being Irish, I do not have the ability.. “
-anonymous
Yep.. that’s about right
10:23 AM - 20 Oct 2016

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityFood/Drink • Thursday, March 16, 2017 • Permalink