A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

Recent entries:
“The shortest distance between two points is always under construction” (6/27)
Entry forthcoming—B.P. (6/27)
“If I had a dollar for every existential crisis I’ve ever had…does money even matter?” (6/27)
“Keep your cymbal jokes to yourself. We’ve heard them all a Zildjian times” (6/27)
Entry forthcoming—B.P. (6/27)
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Entry from September 28, 2004
Gypsy Cab
The Historical Dictionary of American Slang, A-G has citations for "gypsy," meaning an independent migratory trucker, from 1953 and 1960.

A "gypsy cab" is an unlicensed taxi. The use became popular in the 1960s.


23 November 1964, New York Times, pg. 39:
Gypsy Cabs Cruise City - and Thrive - Illegally
(...)
The gypsy drivers are permitted by law to respond only to telephoned or otherwise pre-arranged appointments. But in practice they stop when hailed and thrive in competition with the regular, city-licensed cab drivers, who are bitterly resentful of the gypsies.
Posted by Barry Popik
Transportation • (0) Comments • Tuesday, September 28, 2004 • Permalink