A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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Entry from August 12, 2011
“First the free market dies, then dies democracy”

Folker Hellmeyer, the chief strategist with Bremer Landesbank, was quoted on a German website on October 12, 2008:

“Erst stirbt der freie Markt, dann stirbt die Demokratie.”
“First the free market dies, then dies democracy.”


The blog Zero Hedge published an interview with Hellmeyer (translated from German into English) on December 6, 2010. Hellmeyer’s statement has been frequently used by several financial bloggers.


MMnews
Erst stirbt der freie Markt, dann stirbt die Demokratie
12.10.2008
Was in den letzten Tagen medial geschieht ist ungeheuerlich. Politiker fordern Börsianer auf, keine pessimistischen Parolen zu streuen.

„Erst stirbt der freie Markt, dann stirbt die Demokratie“ (Folker Hellmeyer Chefstratege Bremer Landesbank)

Zero Hedge
I Don’t Want Speculation, I Want Clear Investment
Submitted by smartknowledgeu on 12/06/2010 06:58 -0400
(...)
Folker Hellmeyer, born 1961 in Hamburg, is a banking professional who started his career as foreign exchange trader with Deutsche Bank in Hamburg (1984 – 1987) and London (1988 – 1989). From 1990 to 1995 he worked as an OTC broker in the interbank foreign exchange market at Bierbaum & Co. GmbH & Co. OHG. In 1995 he went as a senior analyst to Landesbank Hessen-Thüringen GZ (Helaba) in Frankfurt. Since April 2002 he has been chief analyst with Bremer Landesbank, where he is responsible for the Foreign Exchange and Money Market Sales department.

In his book “Endlich Klartext” ("At last, clear text"), that was published in 2008 at the Finanzbuch Verlag in Munich, Hellmeyer takes a look behind the scenes of our financial system. His critical analysis provides the reader with an equally entertaining and informative insight into the U.S. financial system and its political background. The functions of the free market, the policy of the central and commercial banks and the role of rating agencies are critically examined and reviewed.

To what extent one can therefore still believe economic data from the United States? How can one look behind the veil of political correctness? What is the aim of the Plunge Protection Team? These are some of his questions. Hellmeyer is one of very few senior bankers in Germany who doesn’t grow tired of reminding the public: “First the free market dies, then dies democracy.”

YouTube
1776 - Crash JP Morgan Buy Silver
2:03
Added: 7 months ago
From: davincij15
(...)
COMMENTS
@eatandtravel - yup crash JP Morgan, and with it the FED. And with it denounce the support for the broken system, where gains are privitised and losses are socialised, and money trickles up. With money, you make money and I’m by no means opposed to capitalism. A monopoly stands in the way of capitalism, favours a few above the rest; is an oligarchy. The german banker said: “First the free market dies, then dies democracy.” I think it is clear many are unaware what is coming. kudos to davincij15
reptilespantoso 6 months ago

the quote came from Folker Hellmeyer. you can google the article, it’s really enlightening.
reptilespantoso 6 months ago

Zero Hedge
Charting The WTF Economy
Submitted by Tyler Durden on 08/12/2011 14:42 -0400
(...)
COMMENTS
by Reptil
on Fri, 08/12/2011 - 17:37
(...)
And “First the free market dies, then dies democracy” Folker Hellmeyer (I never get tired of quoting this) That’s why we’re here, no?

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityBanking/Finance/Insurance • (0) Comments • Friday, August 12, 2011 • Permalink