A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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Entry from May 02, 2015
Fight of the Century (boxing billing)

Many boxing matches have been hyped as the “fight of the century.” John L. Sullivan against Jake Kilrain in 1889 was called “the biggest fight of the century” and “the greatest prize fight of the century.” James J. “Gentleman Jim” Corbett against James L. Sullivan in 1892 was called “the greatest fight of the century.” James J. “Gentleman Jim” Corbett against Bob Fitzsimmons in 1897 was called “the fight of the century.” James Jeffries against Jack Johnson in 1910 was popularly billed as “the fight of the century.”

Muhammad Ali against Joe Frazier at New York City’s Madison Square Garden in 1971 has been frequently referred to as “the fight of the century.”


Wikipedia: Fight of the Century
The Fight of the Century (also known as The Fight) is the title boxing writers and historians have given to the boxing match between champion Joe Frazier (26–0, 23 KOs) and challenger Muhammad Ali (31–0, 25 KOs), held on March 8, 1971, at Madison Square Garden in New York City, New York.

13 July 1889, Boston (MA) Daily Globe, “People Wanted To See It,” pg. 2, col. 4:
They used other and forcible arguments and finally persuaded the sheriff to lot the matter alone and allow the people to see the biggest fight of the century.
(John L. Sullivan against Jake Kilrain.—ed.)

14 July 1889, New York (NY) Herald, pg. 21, col. 1:
HOW THE MILL WAS FOUGHT AND MANAGED.
A Graphic Pen Picture of the Greatest Prize Fight of the Century.
(John L. Sullivan against Jake Kilrain.—ed.)

10 September 1892, The World (New York, NY), pg. 1, right masthead:
THE NEW CHAMPION.
THE SUNDAY WORLD To-MORROW WILL CONTAIN A FULL-LENGTH PORTRAIT OF
JAMES J. CORBETT
A COMPREHENSIVE REVIEW OF THE GREATEST FIGHT OF THE CENTURY AND AN ARTICLE BY THE CHAMPION HIMSELF.
(James J. “Gentleman Jim” Corbett against James L. Sullivan.—ed.)

25 August 1895, Sunday World-Herald (Omaha, NE), “Fists Worth Fortunes,” pt. 2, pg. 16, col. 3:
THE FIGHT OF THE CENTURY.
One thing is certain, that it will be the fight of the century, both men exponents of the new school of pugilism, in which science is everything.
(James J. “Gentleman Jim” Corbett against Bob Fitzsimmons.—ed.)

6 February 1897, New Haven (CT) Evening Register, pg. 1, col. 6:
FIGHT OF THE CENTURY.
What Referee George Siler Says About Corbett-Fitzsimmons Mill.
Chicago, Ill., Feb. 6.—George Siler, who is to referee the Fitzsimmons-Corbett fight, says:

“The fight will take place and I consider it truly the fight of the century.”
(James J. “Gentleman Jim” Corbett against Bob Fitzsimmons.—ed.)

28 August 1900, Trenton (NJ) Times, pg. 5, col. 4 ad:
THE FIGHT OF THE CENTURY!
CORBETT-M’COY
(James J. “Gentleman Jim” Corbett against Kid McCoy.—ed.)

16 June 1910, Seattle (WA) Daily Times, “Gillett Knocks Out Boxing Game With Just One Punch,” pg. 15, col. 1:
With one blow he has crabbed the Jeffries-Johnson fight, billed as “the fight of the century,” and he has the promoters, boxers and all hands and the cook hanging on to the ropes and begging for help.
(James Jeffries against Jack Johnson.—ed.)

OCLC WorldCat record
The fight of the century
Author: Oliver Hardy; Stan Laurel
Publisher: Davenport, Iowa : Blackhawk Films, 1936.
Edition/Format: Film : Film Visual material : English
Database: WorldCat
Summary:
Only Laurel and Hardy could stage a misunderstanding like this ... communication at its worst.

OCLC WorldCat record
The Jell-O program. / [1937-03-07], Fight of the century
Author: Jack Benny; Abe Lyman; Stuart Canin
Publisher: United States : NBC Red, [1937-03-07]
Edition/Format: Audiobook : English
Database: WorldCat
Summary:
“Stuart Canin who played The bee"--Jerry Haendiges Vintage Radio Logs, as viewed on September 2, 2005.

OCLC WorldCat record
Liston-Clay : fight of the century.
Publisher: New York, N.Y. : Complete Sports Publications, Inc., 1964.
Edition/Format: Print book : Biography : English
Database: WorldCat
Summary:
Magazine devoted to the Sonny Liston vs. Cassius Clay fight on February 25, 1964, in Miami Beach, Florida. Liston was the world heavyweight champion, and Clay the glib, fast-talking 22-year-old challenger.

OCLC WorldCat record
The fight of the century : Joe Frazier vs. Muhammad Ali : world heavyweight championship Madison Square Garden, March 8, 1971.
Publisher: New York : Champion Sports, 1971.
Edition/Format: Print book : English

OCLC WorldCat record
Fight of the century : Joe Louis vs. Max Schmeling
Author: Patrick Myler
Publisher: New York : Arcade Pub., ©2012.
Edition/Format: eBook : Document : Biography : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database: WorldCat
Summary:
“The definitive book” (The Ring) on one of the greatest sports events of the twentieth century, the heavyweight championship bout between America’s “Brown Bomber,” Joe Louis, and Germany’s Max Schmeling. More than the world heavyweight championship was at stake when Joe Louis fought Max Schmeling on June 22, 1938. In a world on the brink of war, the fight was depicted as a contest between nations, races, and political ideologies, the symbol of a much vaster struggle. Nazi propaganda minister Joseph Goebbels boasted that the Aryan Schmeling would crush his “inferior” black opponent. President Roosevelt told Louis, his guest at the White House, that “America needs muscles like yours to beat Germany.” For Louis, this was also his chance to avenge the only loss in his brilliant career---by a knockout---to the same Max Schmeling two years earlier. Recreating the drama of their momentous bout, the author traces the lives of both fighters before and after the fight, including Schmeling’s efforts in Nazi Germany to protect Jewish friends and the two boxers’ surprising friendship in the postwar years. In Fight of the Century Myler tells the story of two decent men, drawn together by boxing and divided by the cruel demands of competing nations.

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CitySports/Games • Saturday, May 02, 2015 • Permalink