A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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Entry from June 09, 2016
“Don’t pay for saves” (fantasy baseball adage)

"Don’t pay for saves” (or “Never pay for saves") is a fantasy baseball adage that was popularized by ESPN fantasy sports analyst Matthew Berry. “You remember me saying ‘don’t pay for saves,’ right?” was cited in Berry’s ESPN column of April 19, 2008.

Berry explained the adage in his ESPN column of July 20, 2010:

“Among the many things I am known for is my longtime baseball saying of “Don’t Pay for Saves!’ For those of who don’t play fantasy baseball, the idea behind that credo is that saves are just one category. And often, what you were paying for, by using a high draft pick or being the top bidder for a closer, was opportunity. The difference between Heath Bell and Luke Gregerson this year is not so much skills but rather Bell gets the call in the ninth inning. But there is a lot of turnover in that position, so you have chances to find saves cheaply elsewhere and you can use your draft resources (high draft picks or auction money) to build in other areas.”


Wikipedia: Matthew J. Berry
Matthew J. Berry (born December 29, 1969) is an American writer, columnist, fantasy analyst, and television personality, ESPN fantasy sports analyst and ESPN.com columnist. Berry started as a writer for television and film and creating a few pilots and film scripts with his writing partner Eric Abrams with varying success. After beginning as a content writer for Rotoworld as a side-job, Berry launched his own fantasy sports websites, ‘’TalentedMr.Roto.com’’ in 2004 and ‘’Rotopass.com’’ once the former took off. Berry’s websites were timed perfectly with the rise in fantasy popularity, as the internet aided in making fantasy more accessible. Berry currently works at ESPN, where he has been employed since 2007. He is ESPN’s “Senior Fantasy Sports Analyst”.

ESPN.com
The Talented Mr. Roto: The improbable rise of Joey Votto
Apr 19, 2008
Matthew Berry
ESPN Senior Writer
(...)
Jon Rauch, P, Nationals: You remember me saying “don’t pay for saves,” right? Anyway, if you grabbed Rauch when Chad Cordero hit the DL and you’re about to cut him … not so fast. Eric Karabell mentioned this in his “Relief Efforts” column, but it looks as if Rauch is going to be the guy until Cordero gets his arm strength back up, which hasn’t happened yet.

Twitter
Fantasy Baseball
‏@therotofeed
Use the Rules: Closers (Part 1): “Never pay for saves.” It’s perhaps the most recognizable piece of advice in fa.. http://bit.ly/rEfdl
4:52 PM - 26 Feb 2009

Twitter
Dave Smay
‏@dsmay
@garyvee *Never* pay for saves. Ever. You can always find closers off the waiver wires. #fantasy #baseball
3:11 PM - 28 Mar 2009

ESPN.com
Opening up the ol’ mailbag
May 19, 2010
Matthew Berry (The Talented Mr. Roto)
ESPN Senior Writer
(...)
TMR: I’d ask for a sixth-round pick, which is around when elite closers start going. And I’d do that trade in a heartbeat. You already know I believe that you should never pay for saves.

ESPN.com
The Draft Day Manifesto 2010 edition
Jul 20, 2010
Matthew Berry
ESPN Senior Writer
(...)
Among the many things I am known for is my longtime baseball saying of “Don’t Pay for Saves!” For those of who don’t play fantasy baseball, the idea behind that credo is that saves are just one category. And often, what you were paying for, by using a high draft pick or being the top bidder for a closer, was opportunity. The difference between Heath Bell and Luke Gregerson this year is not so much skills but rather Bell gets the call in the ninth inning. But there is a lot of turnover in that position, so you have chances to find saves cheaply elsewhere and you can use your draft resources (high draft picks or auction money) to build in other areas.

7 May 2012, News Journal (Mansfield, OH), “Fantasy Baseball: Last week proves, again, why you never pay for saves” by Chad Conant:
From a fantasy standpoint, there are two angles. You could replace RoboMo with a proven closer and snag Rafael Soriano in hope he will get some saves. But, if you want the best pitcher left in the bullpen, snag David Robertson.

Baseball Prospectus
May 29, 2013
Fantasy Freestyle
Your Annual Reminder: Don’t Pay for Saves

by Jason Collette
“Don’t pay for saves!” is an adage that ESPN’s Matthew Berry may have printed on his tombstone when he leaves this life. But while it has been uttered by many a pundit, from Berry to industry stalwart Lenny Melnick, we still see significant money spent on closers even in expert auctions each season. In the 2013 15-team mixed Tout Wars league, nine percent of the overall draft dollars went to players that have saved at least one game this season.

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CitySports/Games • Thursday, June 09, 2016 • Permalink