A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

Recent entries:
“Better days are just around the corner. They are called Friday, Saturday and Sunday” (3/29)
“Nothing screws up your Friday like realizing it’s only Thursday” (3/29)
“Thursday—the most useless day of the week” (3/29)
“It’s Thursday, or as I like to call it: Day 4 of the hostage situation” (3/29)
“New York leads all cities in the number of people around whom you shouldn’t make a sudden move” (3/29)
More new entries...

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Entry from July 17, 2005
Dock-walloper
New York City was once known for its ports. A "dock walloper" is a loafer on those docks.


(Oxford English Dictionary)
dock-walloper (U.S.), a casual labourer engaged at docks and wharfs
1860 BARTLETT Dict. Amer., *Dock walloper, a loafer that hangs about the wharves. New York.
1879 Lumberman's Gaz. 15 Oct., Dockwollopers are paid 40 to 45 cents an hour.

July 1841, Arcturus, A Journal of Books and Opinion (New York), pg. 130:
The sunny weather has brought out the loafers, and the codgers, and the dock wallopers again, in all their glory.
Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityWorkers/People • Sunday, July 17, 2005 • Permalink