A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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Entry from June 19, 2011
Condé Nasty (Condé Nast nickname)

Condé Nast Publications is a worldwide magazine publishing company located in the Condé Nast building (4 Times Square). The Condé Nast nickname of “Condé Nasty” has been frequently used since at least the 1980s.


Wikipedia: Condé Nast Publications
Condé Nast (pronounced /ˌkɒndeɪˈnæst/) is a worldwide magazine publishing company. Its main offices are located in New York, Chicago, Miami, Madrid, Milan, Tokyo, London, Paris and Moscow. Founded by Condé Nast, the firm is currently run by S.I. Newhouse Jr. It is a division of Advance Publications, which has owned the company since 1959.

Wikipedia: Condé Nast Building
The Condé Nast Building, officially 4 Times Square, is a modern skyscraper in Times Square in Midtown Manhattan. Located on Broadway between 42nd Street and 43rd, the structure was finished in January 2000 as part of a larger project to redevelop 42nd Street. The building stretches 48 stories to 809 ft (247 m) making it the 12th tallest building in New York City and the 41st tallest in the United States. The size of the tower raised concerns from the city about what impact this sized tower would have on Times Square. The major office space tenants are magazine publishing company Condé Nast and Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom, a prominent U.S. law firm. Duane Reade is a major retail tenant.

OCLC WorldCat record
Works on paper : Edward Steichen : the condé nasty years : The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, January 24 - March 25, 1984.
Author: Edward Steichen; Museum of Fine Arts (Houston, Tex.)
Publisher: Houston : The Museum of Fine Arts, 1984.
Edition/Format:  Book : English

Google Books
Critical Essays on H. L. Mencken
By Douglas C. Stenerson
Boston, MA: G.K. Hall
1987
Pg. 57:
There are various Vanity Fair and Conde Nasty contributions to American — “undies” for underwear — that deserve to be noted.

Google Books
27 April 1992, New York magazine, “War of the Poses” by Michael Gross, pg. 30, col. 1:
To the outside world, Conde Nast had become Conde Nasty.

10 December 1995, Philadelphia (PA) Inquirer, “A guide to notable selections,” pg. K1:
Makes clear there are reasons Newhouse’s empire is dubbed Conde Nasty.

Google Books
Spin Sisters:
How the women of the media sell unhappiness--and liberalism—to the women of America

By Myrna Blyth
New York, NY: St. Martin’s Griffin
2005
Pg. 70:
Grace’s diminutive boss, Si Newhouse, chairman of Conde Nast, publishers of a string of glossies including Glamour, Architectural Digest, and Vanity Fair and known in the trade as Conde Nasty, called only afterward to tell Grace that yes, sorry, she was toast.

Google Books
The Gawker Guide to Conquering All Media
By Chelsea Peretti, Bridie Clark, Gawker Media
New York, NY: Simon & Schuster
2007
Pg. 146:
For example, in the world of the industry insider blogger, Condé Nast becomes “Condé Nasty,” or a difficult boss is known only as “Chankles” or “Pig Cunt.”

New York (NY) Post
CONDE NASTY
MIDDLE EAST TOO VIOLENT FOR VOGUE, BOSS SNARLSBy LUKAS I. ALPERT
Posted: 5:00 AM, June 2, 2007
It seems burqas are out of Vogue this year.

In a harshly worded e-mail, Conde Nast International Chairman Jonathan Newhouse angrily rejected a proposal to print a Middle East edition of Vogue pointing to the region’s “violent elements.”

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityWork/Businesses • (0) Comments • Sunday, June 19, 2011 • Permalink